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Making waves – NZ Coastal Society Celebrates 20 years


New Zealand Coastal Society media release

Making waves – New Zealand Coastal Society celebrates 20 years

This week, coastal scientists, engineers, planners, and managers will gather in Auckland for the New Zealand Coastal Society’s 20th annual conference.

Conference presentations by some of New Zealand’s foremost coastal experts will range from coastal hazards, to work on the Rena recovery, to protecting surf breaks, to hydrodynamic modelling.

NZCS Chair Dr Deirdre Hart says the annual conference offers coastal researchers and practitioners an opportunity to discuss some of New Zealand’s most pressing coastal issues.

“As an island nation, the need to have a forum for coastal professionals to share findings from their work and research is crucial. One of the society’s strengths is that it encourages robust discussions across disciplines.”

Waterfront Auckland Chair Bob Harvey will open the conference with insights on the organisation’s strategic approach to development on Auckland’s waterfront. On the final day of the conference, Dr Mark Orams of AUT University will discuss the role of Marine Protected Areas as recreation and tourism resources and Environment Court Judge Laurie Newhook will talk about 20 years of the RMA and New Zealand’s coastal policy.

NZCS Conference Chair Hugh Leersnyder says it’s fitting that the 20th annual conference is being held in Auckland.

“As the country’s most populous city, Auckland’s coastal environment faces fierce management pressures. The conference is an opportunity for coastal professionals to get a first-hand look at some of the ways Auckland is responding to those pressures, and to glean insights on how other regions in New Zealand are managing their coastal environment.”

The NZCS conference, ‘Making waves, 20 years and beyond’, is scheduled for 14 to 16 November, Royal NZ Yacht Squadron, Auckland. The conference programme can be downloaded.

The New Zealand Coastal Society was formed in 1992 to promote and advance knowledge and understanding of the coastal zone. An IPENZ technical group, the society has over 400 members including representatives from a wide range of coastal science, engineering and planning disciplines.

ENDS

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