Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


UC Research: Young Adults Who Are Also Managing Diabetes

UC Researching Difficult Times For Young Adults Who Are Also Managing Diabetes

November 13, 2012

A University of Canterbury researcher is exploring how young adults manage their diabetes and especially how they manage their fitness.

Adolescence is a time when young people take on more of the responsibility from their parents but it can also be a time of conflict.

UC masters student Mindy McPherson is surveying young people aged 18 to 24 with Type 1 diabetes so they can have their say about developing responsibility. A lot of research has looked at adolescent diabetes management from a parent’s point of view.

``I will be looking at the data gathered in the context of what we know about typical adolescent development, exercise management in adolescence and managing type 1 diabetes, a life-long chronic illness,’’ McPherson said today.

``The aim of this project is to discover the changes from parent directed exercise and activities to adolescent-directed exercise and activities and on to young adult autonomy.

``Participants are first interviewed about their exercise and activities during their teen years and about parent-directed to adolescent-directed changes. Then participants will wear an actigraph activity monitor for a week.

``After the week, participants receive a visual presentation of their activity levels. I’ll discuss this with them. This will give me an insight into their current activity level that they would not otherwise have.

``Exercise is an important part of managing diabetes because it makes the body use insulin better and is associated with a reduction in weight and stress, an improvement in mood, and reduced risks of developing cardiovascular complication in the future.

``Exercise changes the amount of glucose in the blood, so for people with type 1 diabetes it must be managed carefully to prevent hypo- or hyperglycaemia from occurring afterwards,’’ McPherson said.

Her project is being carried out under the supervision of Associate Professors Kathleen Liberty and Pauline Barnett of UC’s Health Sciences Centre.

By 2020, one in 22 Pakeha and one in six Maori and Pacific Island adults are predicted to have diabetes, in line with a worldwide epidemic. Diabetes is a major public health issue and a significant
economic burden.

The World Health Organisation estimates 346 million people worldwide have diabetes. Over 200,000 New Zealanders have diabetes, with one in 32 Pakeha adults and one in 12 Maori and Pacific Islanders suffering. Two out of three Maori and Pacific Island diabetics die from diabetic complications, compared to one in three Pakeha diabetics.

If left unchecked the disease would consume 15 percent of the NZ health budget in the treatment of complications, such as loss to eyesight, limb amputations, renal damage, heart disease and strokes.

Associate Professor Liberty said the key to prevention could be understanding how individuals come to be responsible for their own management, rather than retaining a dependent relationship on others for management.

``We are hoping that this study will help progress our understanding of this important issue,’’ she said.
www.canterbury.ac.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Prefu Roundup: Forecasts Revised, Surplus Intact

The National government heads into the election with its Budget surplus target broadly intact, delivering a set of economic and fiscal forecasts marginally revised from May to reflect weaker commodity prices and a lower tax take. More>>

ALSO:

Convention Centre: Major New SkyCity Hotel And Laneway For Auckland

Today SKYCITY Entertainment Group Limited revealed plans to build a new hotel and pedestrian laneway of bars, restaurants and boutique shopping on land it owns in the Nelson and Hobson Streets block, expanding the SKYCITY Entertainment Precinct. More>>

ALSO:

Igniting The Spark: Bringing The Digital Enabler To Life

Changing a name is, relatively speaking, the easy part of a re-invention. Changing a culture, getting all the ducks in a row, turning yourself inside-out to become customer-inspired is a much bigger challenge. More>>

ALSO:

Ebola And NZ: Targeted Screening At Airport But Risk Low

The risk of any cases of Ebola in New Zealand remains very low, but health and border authorities are well prepared... anyone arriving in New Zealand who in the last three weeks has visited countries affected will be screened for symptoms of the disease. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Brewer Seeking Crowd-Funding Cancels Shareholders’ Dividends

Shareholders in Renaissance Brewing company, the first business to seek equity through crowd-funding in New Zealand, have cancelled their claim on $147,000 of accumulated earnings “to make Renaissance a more attractive investment opportunity.” More>>

ALSO:

It's Spark Now:
Why Telecom Wanted To Change

New Zealand led the world when Chorus demerged from Telecom. It gave us a telecommunications industry structure where the network is completely separated from the products and services it delivers. The changes brought about a new market dynamic and it dramatically changed Telecom’s role. More>>

ALSO:

Glass Half Empty: Dairy Prices Fall To Lowest Since 2012

Dairy product prices slumped to the lowest level since October 2012 in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, paced by whole milk powder and cheddar. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Computer Power Plus

Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news