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Eradicating Unnecessary World Blindness


Eradicating Unnecessary World Blindness

On Wednesday, 28 November, Professor Geoffrey Tabin, MD will present a review of where we stand in the fight against the major blinding conditions in our world and discuss how Nepal, the poorest country in South Asia, has been able to develop the best eye care system in the region. The talk will end with our successes in Bhutan and Tibet and our struggle in Africa.”

In 1995 Dr. Ruit and Dr. Geoffrey Tabin founded the Himalayan Cataract Project, dedicated to improving world eye care through training and developing Infrastructure.

Dr Tabin has been named the ‘unsung hero’ by the Dalai Lama for his international work and dedication to eradicate unnecessary world blindness and sustain ophthalmic health care in the developing world. Dr Geoffrey Tabin leads the International Division of the John A. Moran Eye Centre as part of his vision to provide high quality ophthalmic care, education, and establishment of a world-class eye care infrastructure.

“In the Himalaya region, blindness is a death sentence. People long thought that as you grow old, your hair turns white, your eyes turn white and you die." Said Dr. Tabin.

Geoffrey Tabin, MD is a professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and Director of International Ophthalmology at the John A. Moran Eye Center and University of Utah. He specialises in Cornea, cataract and refractive surgery. Dr Tabin graduated from Yale College, earned a MA in philosophy at Oxford as a Marshall Scholar, and is also the co-founder of the Himalayan Cataract Project. Other research discussed at RANZCO’s Congress:

Blindness Prevention in South East Asia Tomorrow, Ophthalmologists will discuss blindness prevention initiatives in South East Asia at an Overseas Development Symposium chaired by A/Prof Nitin Verma AO. Some of the items discussed will include: Cataract outcomes in Laos, East Timor Eye studies, diabetic retinopathy in the Solomon Islands and more.

Quiet please! Effect of distraction on simulated posterior segment surgical performance

Dr Gerry McGowan, from the Tennent Institute of Ophthalmology in the UK is presenting research which to his knowledge is the first of its kind on the effect of distraction on simulated posterior segment surgical performance.

“The effect of cognitive distraction on surgical performance is poorly understood as it is not suitable to carry out distraction tests in a live operating theatre” said Dr Gerry McGowan.
“We suggest that best practice excludes any communication with the surgeon not immediately related to the case in hand.” Dr Gerry McGowan concludes.


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