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New company name for Lincoln Ventures Ltd

Lincoln Agritech Ltd
Announcing that from Monday 10th December, Lincoln Ventures will be called Lincoln Agritech


After nearly two decades of science and engineering achievement under the name of Lincoln Ventures, and an organisational history that dates back to our formation as the NZ Agricultural Engineering Institute (NZAEI) in 1964, we felt the need to change our name to better reflect our unique position in the New Zealand science system as an agritech-focused science and engineering research company owned by New Zealand’s only specialist land-based university, Lincoln University.

We’ve had a long history of adding value through our research and development to the sector; Lincoln Ventures itself was created in 1994 through combining a number of operations including the New Zealand Agricultural Engineering Institute (NZAEI), the Kellogg Farm Management Unit and the Centre for Resource Management. In many ways, the new focus we’re announcing represents a link between our historical work and the opportunity that still exists to support New Zealand’s primary industries and the environment through the application of our technologies.

Lincoln Agritech’s core capabilities are well aligned with the value chain of the primary sector – from on-farm precision management of inputs such as fertiliser and irrigation, to protecting the sustainable productivity of the land and environment, to maximising the efficiency and value-add of manufacturing and processing activities by applying new sensor technologies.

We will continue to be just as active in engaging across all the key sectors we’ve previously covered including environmental services, high value manufacturing, and software consulting. Much of the work underpinning our core science platforms originated from an initial focus on identified needs in the primary sector, with the results later being applied upstream or downstream in the value chain, or in another sector in consultation with our clients. We’re excited by our current research and how it could also benefit a wide range of stakeholders.


WHY ARE WE CHANGING?
We felt that the name Lincoln Agritech better reflects our unique position in the New Zealand science system as an agritech-focused science and engineering research company owned by New Zealand’s only specialist land-based university, Lincoln University.
• We wanted our name to better represent the role that our organisation fills in providing significant science and engineering research and development services to the primary sector.
• We believe that the future of New Zealand’s primary sector has considerable need for ena-bling technologies to bridge the challenges associated with sustainable growth. We see Lin-coln Agritech as having a key role in continuing to deliver these tools and technologies in the future.
• We wanted to strengthen the markets understanding of our relationship with Lincoln Univer-sity and to clarify that our organisation is not the commercialisation office for Lincoln Univer-sity, but is an independent science and engineering research services provider.


WHAT WILL LINCOLN AGRITECH DO?
Lincoln Agritech will continue to be a key research and development services provider, operating as a wholly owned subsidiary of Lincoln University. Lincoln Agritech employs around 40 staff with diverse skills, including scientists, research engineers and software developers. Lincoln Agritech has five key complementary areas of expertise, which together provide unique R&D solutions to New Zealand’s primary, industrial and environmental sectors:

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