Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


New Zealanders’ genetic diversity to be mapped

New Zealanders’ genetic diversity to be mapped

A leading University of Otago biological anthropologist has won a prestigious two-year James Cook Research Fellowship to undertake the first-ever survey of the genetic diversity of New Zealand’s population.

Department of Anatomy Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith’s project is titled: “The longest journey – from Africa to Aotearoa” and involves collecting DNA from around 1000 New Zealanders. These samples will allow their migration histories to be revealed through analysis of variation in genetic markers passed down exclusively through the maternal and paternal lines respectively.

Professor Matisoo-Smith says the research will help map the many pathways our ancestors took that ultimately brought each of us here.

She intends to sample the five major urban populations of Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin, possibly combined with some smaller cities and towns.

“This project provides a unique opportunity to undertake a nation-wide survey of New Zealand ancestry. In addition to collecting a DNA sample and basic personal information, we will also ask about birthplace, parents’ and grandparents’ first language, ethnic self-identification and similar socio-demographic data to that collected in the census.”

Professor Matisoo-Smith says the research will provide a very interesting picture of the social history of a multicultural New Zealand.

“For example, we will be able to see if the genetic history of the population of Dunedin, with its strong Scottish heritage, is significantly different from that of the Auckland or Wellington today.

“Also, Auckland is the most ethnically diverse region in the country based on self-identification. We will now be able to see how well this matches up genetic diversity as measured by mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome diversity.”

About James Cook Research Fellowships:

James Cook Research Fellowships allow leading researchers to concentrate on their chosen research for two years without the additional burden of administrative and teaching duties. The fellowships are presented to researchers who demonstrate that they have achieved national and international recognition in their area of scientific research. The funding package annually is $100,000 plus GST and up to $10,000 plus GST in relevant expenses.

This year the Royal Society of New Zealand received proposals from 27 James Cook applicants spanning three broad research areas: biological sciences; physical sciences; and social sciences. Three Assessment Panels scored the proposals and four Fellows were recommended for funding.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news