Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Blisteringly fast liquid flow technique to help industry

UC researching blisteringly liquid flow technique to help industry

December 7, 2012

The University of Canterbury (UC) is researching a liquid flow measurement technique that is so blisteringly fast it opens up new applications for industry.

UC is developing a sensor that can measure the flow of fluid using pressure waves that travel at three times the speed of sound which could help in the design of jet or car engines, and also in the monitoring of all systems involving fluids. This sensor is capable of producing up to 200,000 samples a second.

The technology is also used in the development of a fault detection system for pipelines that can help in the rebuild of the Canterbury pipeline infrastructure.

Normal flow meters are very slow by comparison. The UC technology will allow preventative maintenance of pumping systems before they have costly failures and in precision dynamic fluid applications.

Flow measurement is a fairly common thing in many water and gas systems and UC researchers are inventing a new sensor with great speed and practical advantages.

UC PhD student researcher Aya Kashima, under the supervision of UC civil and natural resources engineering senior lecturer Dr Pedro Lee, is looking to fine tune the new flow meter sensor.

"Unless you measure the flow rate you cannot possibly audit how much groundwater is being used," Kashima said.

"Hydropower stations measure the flow and pressure to diagnose the operation of systems such as making sure the turbines are operating properly. These are all possible applications for the device."

Significant changes are required to install current flow meters. They have to rip out and replace a section of pipe to install it. There are associated down time and costs with this. A device like the once UC is developing does not need any changes to the system and can utilise existing pressure measurements for producing the flow rate

The accuracy of flow measurement is vital for the management of our groundwater and natural gas, for control of industrial processes and the operation of hydroelectric power systems.

The current slow sampling speed means that rapid changes in flow, such as those commonly seen in fuel injection lines or pharmaceutical processes, cannot be detected using current systems.

Kashima said the researchers were fine tuning the flow of liquid sensor in a pipeline system at their fluid mechanics laboratory on campus.

"We will continue research in 2013 so we can improve the sensor’s capabilities," she said.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Food: Govt Obesity Plan - No Tax Or Legislation

Speaking to Q+A’s Corin Dann this morning, health minister Jonathan Coleman said tackling obesity was at the top of the Government’s priority list, but there was “no evidence” a sugar tax worked, and further regulation was unnecessary. More>>

ALSO:

Treasury Docs On LVR Policy: Government Inaction Leads To Blurring Of Roles

The Treasury wouldn’t have had to warn the Reserve Bank to stick to its core functions if the Government had taken prompt and substantial measures to rein in skyrocketing Auckland house prices, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

Final EPA Decision: Tough Bar Set For Ruataniwha Dam

Today’s final decision by the Tukituki Catchment Board of Inquiry is good news for the river and the environment, says Labour’s Water spokesperson Meka Whaitiri. “Setting a strict level of dissolved nitrogen in the catchment’s waters will ensure that the dam has far less of an impact on the Tukituki river." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news