Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search


Kaka numbers on the rise at Pukaha Mount Bruce!

Kaka numbers on the rise at Pukaha Mount Bruce!

We are very proud to confirm that kaka are flourishing at Pukaha Mount Bruce where official figures have estimated more than 160 kaka live on our 940 hectare reserve. The last census in 2007 estimated 82 kaka were established at the Pukaha reserve - meaning numbers have doubled in five years.

The kaka population began in 1996 when just nine juvenile kaka were released into the Pukaha forest - the first kaka at Pukaha in 50 years.

Kathy Houkamau, our fantastic Centre Manager, said "The results of the census are very encouraging. The Pukaha forest can sustain many more birds and we're looking forward to seeing the population continuing to grow".

This dramatic increase is due to kaka breeding in the wild as kaka are not part of our captive breeding programme. Pukaha's pest control programme plays a significant role in keeping predator numbers down, allowing kaka eggs and chicks to survive. Over $150,000 each year is required just to maintain the current level of pest control on the reserve. In addition to our pest control programme inside the reserve, Greater Wellington Regional Council and Horizons Regional Council help to protect the 'buffer' zone around Pukaha Mount Bruce to attempt to prevent predators from reaching the Pukaha reserve in the first place.

The census was completed over several months in order to ensure an accurate figure. Kaka are known to fly to Kapiti Island and back in a day, so tracking them is no easy feat.

Kaka engage in a highly entertaining 'kaka circus' each day at 3pm when Department of Conservation rangers give them a tasty afternoon snack to the delight of our visitors. The snack is enough to provide the kaka an incentive to come in and provide a close up look for visitors, but isn't enough to replace the need to hunt for their own food in the wild. If you haven't already seen this spectacular sight, make sure you include it as a must for this summer.

Kaka are known to be particularly intelligent birds, with powerful wings and feet which allow them to jump through the trees and tumble through the air, hanging from branches to reach fruit and flowers. Many of you will already know that kaka are close relatives to the cheeky kea.
Come see them soon!


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Shocking Dairy Footage: MPI Failing Our Animals And Damaging Our Reputation

Greens “Nathan Guy needs to urgently look into how his ministry is enforcing animal welfare standards, how these appalling incidents happened under its watch and what it’s going to do prevent similar incidents happening again in the future." More>>


Land & Water Forum: Fourth Report On Water Management

The Land and Water Forum (LWF) today published its fourth report, outlining 60 new consensus recommendations for how New Zealand should improve its management of fresh water and calling on the Government to urgently adopt all of its recommendations from earlier reports. More>>



Welcome Home: Record High Migration Stokes 41-Year High Population Growth

New Zealand annual net migration hit a new high in October as more people arrived from than departed for Australia for the first time in more than 20 years. More>>


Citizens' Advice Bureau: Report Shows Desperate Housing Situation Throughout NZ

CAB's in-depth analysis of over 2000 client enquiries about emergency accommodation shows vulnerable families, pregnant women and children living in cars and garages, even after seeking assistance from the Ministry of Social Development and Housing New Zealand. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news