Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


NZ's Green Data Future Stymied by Lack of Second Cable


www.MulticoreWorld.com

New Zealand’s green data future stymied by lack of second cable


Press Release - Wednesday, 9 January 2013
Multicore World 2013

New Zealand will never be an exporter of data, but will continue to suffer as major importers, until the country gets a second fibre optic cable.

“By implication, we’re missing out on some of the major opportunities hosting and exporting cloud based services from massive data crunching to film rendering, as well as storage,” says TUANZ chief executive, Paul Brislen.

“What makes it worse is we could provide increasingly demanded green power to run these massive installations. Arguably, it would be a much better use of the 15% of our total power that runs Tiwai Aluminium.”

Brislen says government and others are making a fundamental mistake in thinking a second cable would only be handling incoming data. That’s a feed to only 4 million people.

The ability, which we don’t have at the moment, to export data, to billions, completely changes the equation Brislen says.

“It’s a bit of a chicken and egg argument, but we’re totally forgetting the use we as inventive Kiwis will make through being able to easily and cheaply export data to the world,” he says.

A second cable would guarantee redundancy and an instant backup for those companies willing to build and service server farms and the river of data streaming from them.

Brislen says that throwing in the green data cloud storage opportunity makes a second cable most attractive.

“The other part of the infrastructure for all this is the use of multicore computers and parallel programming and the total IT architecture change that that brings about,” says Brislen.

Multicore World 2013, a two-day conference with an internationally-recognised cast of speakers on the opportunities, challenges and implications of many core processors on one chip takes place on February 19 & 20 at Wellington Town Hall.

“I’d encourage as many people as can, to get to the conference,” says Multicore World 2013 founder Nicolas Erdody. “It’s the only place, certainly in the southern hemisphere, where you’d learn about and understand what’s happening with the intersection of fundamental drivers of the next data and communications revolution.”

“I can imagine too, Multicore World’s break-time conversations will be extremely interesting. As always, that’ll be where connections and deals are made, insights gained.”

Multicore World 2013 boasts speakers who are authorities on computer architecture which allows parallel processing and massively increased computer, smartphone and other device performance.

Among Multicore World 2013 experts are IBM’s Paul McKenney, Intel’s Tim Mattson , Prof Ian Foster of Argonne National Laboratory and FreeBSD’s Poul-Henning Kamp.

Discounted GreenButton, Catalyst IT and Scoop.co.nz sponsored registration tickets to the Multicore World 2013 are available during January for $750. The full registration fee is $950.

ENDS

Contacts
Nicolas Erdody, Director Open Parallel. Nicolas.erdody@openparallel.com (027 521 4020)
Karen Bender, Business Growth Manager, Grow Wellington. Karen.bender@growwellington.co.nz (021 628 144)

What is multicore?
The ability of computers to process massive amounts of data has been growing ever since they were invented.

As computer power has increased, the speed of processing has reached a physical barrier, and more processing power cannot be put onto a chip without overheating.

The problem has been solved by putting more processors onto a single chip, creating multicore chips. These multicore chips entered the mainstream market a few years ago, and all vendors currently sell them. They are now standard kit in all laptops, desktops and smartphones.

Multicore chips are also more power efficient, and the number of cores able to be added is theoretically virtually unlimited.

Previously impossible computational tasks can now be achieved. And processes which previously took, days or even weeks to perform can now be done swiftly.

But while this new processing power enables computers to do things faster, it also adds new challenges.

Before Multicore computer software was written for a single central processing unit (CPU) in a chip. To exploit the potential of multicore chips, software now needs to be written while thinking in parallel.

But parallel programming is different than traditional programming, and so far few programmers have experience of it.

Multicore is a mainstream but (as yet) niche new technology.

In the next 10-15 years, there will be huge opportunities to translate sequential programming (‘traditional’) legacy code, and to create new software that takes full advantage of thousands of cores in the next generation of chips.

Around the world parallel computing is currently used to process vast quantities of data produced by the internet and the "big data" originating out of social networks and millions of intelligent data recording devices attached to the internet.

Here in NZ it is also used in the biggest CGI rendering facility in the world at Wellington's Weta Digital.

And soon it will be a key component of the information processing required to handle the data produced by the Square Kilometer Array radio - telescope – a global scientific project that New Zealand is a part of.

In addition, there is a wide range of services, solutions and systems integration challenges to connect the two world's together.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Scoop Business: RBNZ Keeps OCR At 3.5%, Signals Slower Pace Of Future Hikes

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler kept the official cash rate at 3.5 percent and signalled he won’t be as aggressive with future rate hikes as previously thought as inflation remains tamer than expected. The kiwi dollar fell to a seven-month low. More>>

ALSO:

Weather: Dry Spells Take Hold In South Island

Many areas in the South Island are tracking towards record dry spells as relatively warm, dry weather that began in mid-August continues... for some South Island places, the current period of fine weather is quite rare. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Productivity Commission To Look At Housing Land Supply

The Productivity Commission is to expand on its housing affordability report with an investigation into improving land supply and development capacity, particularly in areas with strong population growth. More>>

ALSO:

Forestry: Man Charged After 2013 Death

Levin Police have arrested and charged a man with manslaughter in relation to the death of Lincoln Kidd who was killed during a tree felling operation on 19 December 2013. More>>

ALSO:

Smells Like Justice: Dairy Company Fined Over Odour

Dairy company fined over odour Dairy supply company Open Country Dairy Limited has been convicted and fined more than $35,000 for discharging objectionable odour from its Waharoa factory at the time of last year’s ”spring flush” when milk supply was high. More>>

Scoop Business: Dairy Product Prices Decline To Lowest Since July 2012

Dairy product prices dropped to the lowest level since July 2012 in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, led by a slump in rennet casein and butter milk powder. More>>

ALSO:

SOE Results: TVNZ Lifts Annual Profit 25% On Flat Ad Revenue, Quits Igloo

Television New Zealand, the state-owned broadcaster, lifted annual profit 25 percent, ahead of forecast and despite a dip in advertising revenue, while quitting its stake in the pay-TV Igloo joint venture with Sky Network Television. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Computer Power Plus

Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news