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Auckland scientists get chance to be Science Media SAVVY

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Auckland scientists get chance to be Science Media SAVVY
30 January 2013
Scientists in the Auckland area will get the chance to hone their media skills when the Science Media Centre brings its acclaimed Science Media SAVVY training course to the region.

The two-day SAVVY course is designed to help scientists at any stage of their career gain the confidence and skills to engage with the media - and get their science across effectively.

Participants tap into the SMC's experience in covering a wide range of complex and often controversial science-related issues in a series of exercises which include simulated TV broadcast interviews and a story pitching session to senior journalists.

The SMC's last SAVVY workshop held in Christchurch in October was a great success, with several of the participants quickly going on to become valued sources for the media.

"This is one of the most important things we have done at the SMC," says Science Media Center manager, Peter Griffin.

"The media is hungry for science stories, but often the barrier to science getting a decent run is an inability of researchers to articulate the value of their science to society. The course helps them do that and respond effectively when their expertise is urgently needed."

The next Science Media SAVVY course will be held Thursday and Friday 14 - 15 March 2013 in Auckland, hosted by the Liggins Institute, 85 Park Road, Grafton campus of the University of Auckland.

Applicants for this workshop must be:

- Active researchers or scientists (at any stage of their career)
- Able to nominate a specific project or area of expertise they think is of potential interest to media
Course fees for the Auckland two-day workshop will be $795 +GST.

One scholarship covering full course fees, sponsored by 2011 Prime Minister's Science Media Communication Award winner Dr Mark Quigley, is available to a qualifying postgraduate student who shows exceptional promise in the field of science communication.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE FRIDAY 8 FEB 2013 AT 6 PM

More information
For more information, or to apply, please see the Science Media SAVVY section of our website

If you live in another part of New Zealand and would like to register your interest in applying for a future workshop in your area, please contact the Science Media Centre at
smc@sciencemediacentre.co.nz with "SAVVY" in the subject line.

Science Media SAVVY is a collaboration of the Australian Science Media Centre and Science Media Centre NZ, with initial funding support from CSIRO and the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Ongoing support for SAVVY workshops in New Zealand has been provided by the 2011 Prime Minister's Science Media Communication award winner, Dr Mark Quigley.

ENDS

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