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Kim Hill To Chair Big Data Discussions


Media Release from the National Library of New Zealand
Kim Hill To Chair Big Data Discussions

Some big questions about the interaction of ‘place’ and ‘information’ in an age when increasingly vast amounts of data are being gathered will be considered in a series of panel discussions to be hosted by Radio New Zealand broadcaster, Kim Hill.

In conjunction with the newly-reopened National Library’s Big Data programme, a panel of experts will consider the nature of place and how big data is changing our world in a series of public discussions to be held at Royal Society Lecture Theatre in Wellington

“This data and new technology allow us to see what is happening at the planetary and community levels,” explains Keith Thorsen, from the National Library’s Public Programmes team. “They also allow us to increase our understanding of natural forces, the way our bodies function and how processes work at the nano level. Across spectrum and scale we can see what was previously invisible.

“At the same time as we are gathering this data, there is an increasing desire to share it, raising questions about intellectual property.”

Speakers discussing place and the planet include Dr Mark Quigley, winner of the Prime Minister’s Science Communication Prize for his work after the Christchurch earthquakes; Bob Harvey, former Mayor of Waitakere City; Dr Mark Sagar, winner of two Academy Awards for animation; Bill Macnaught, National Librarian; architect Stephen McDougall, and Dr Cornel de Ronde, who has worked on rediscovering the Pink and White Terraces and undersea “black smoker” volcanoes.

Speakers discussing the effect of living in an increasingly digital world, the issues surrounding intellectual property and open data include Julian Carver, spokesperson for Open New Zealand; technology commentator, Peter Griffin; Director of Creative Freedom Foundation, Bronwyn Holloway-Smith and Guy Ryan, Director of Inspiring Stories Trust.

The discussions series, which is open to the public, starts on February 14. Tickets are $10 and they can be bought at www.royalsociety.org.nz Details can also be found on the National Library website www.natlib.govt.nz.

ENDS

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