Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


The Monarch is dead, long live the Monarch

The Monarch is dead, long live the Monarch

"The king is dead, long live the king!". The original phrase was translated from the French 'Le roi est mort, vive le roi!', which was first declared upon the accession to the French throne of Charles VII after the death of his father Charles VI in 1422.

So my subject is a play on words – no doubt someone could have said it better as I’m a lot brain dead after our very successful and wonderful conference. Keynote speakers visiting the country: Brian Cutting (recently of USDA Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit), David James (Washington State) and Myron Zalucki (University of Queensland) - and then some fantastic Kiwis broadened our knowledge of how to help NZ's Lepidoptera.

Things ARE different for Monarch butterflies in NZ to their habitat in other countries. There are no indigenous milkweeds so each year the Monarch depends on humans to plant or grow milkweeds. Without humans, the Monarch would no doubt not survive. Did you note the story in the media a few years ago, that the Monarch migration is down to 19% of what it once was?

At our Annual General Meeting yesterday a resolution was passed that our name be changed to the Moths and Butterflies of NZ Trust (MBNZT) so over the next few months you will see a gradual change taking place on our website (www.monarch.org.nz) in our name and perhaps an increase in the focus to include more and more information about other butterflies and moths. It won't be THAT different - check out www.nzbutterflies.org.nz.

But that does NOT mean we don’t still love the Monarch. It is such a wonderful ambassador (vanguard might be a better word, if we’re keeping it in royal circles) for the other butterflies… and moths… and insects generally… and the environment, biodiversity, ecology. All those things that people seem to have become detached from in recent years.

So long live the Monarch! Let’s do all we can to ensure that continues.

--

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:


Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news