Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


UC Researching One of the Largest Studies On Depression

UC Researching One of the Largest Studies On Depression
 
April 30, 2013
 
A University of Canterbury (UC) researcher is undertaking a large study testing the effects of probiotics on people suffering depression.
 
A UC psychology research PhD student Amy Romijn is specifically carrying out her study looking at probiotics in a depressed population.
 
``This is the biggest study on people who have overt psychological symptoms. Other academic studies have investigated the effects of probiotics versus placebo on mostly healthy volunteers,’’ Romijn says.
 
``One in six New Zealanders will experience serious depression at some time in their life. About one in seven young people in New Zealand will experience a major depressive disorder before the age of 24.
 
``Women have higher rates of depression than men. One in five women, compared with one in eight men, will have depression over their lifetime.
 
``The World Health Organisation estimates that by the year 2020, depression will be the second most common cause of ill health and premature worldwide.
 
``I hope my study will find that treatment with probiotics changes the levels of certain substances in the blood and the brain, essentially making people happier. I will be testing 80 people over a 16-week period.
 
``We want to find out if probiotics are more effective than a placebo in reducing the psychological symptoms of depression.
 
``There are many links in the literature which lead us to believe that probiotics will work to treat depression. Many studies have had success in treating symptoms of stress and inflammation with probiotics and there is a firm association between stress and depression and biological links between depression and inflammation.
 
``We’re also trying to find out about the way probiotics exert their effects on psychological symptoms by measuring for chemicals in blood samples. Higher stress levels are associated with lowered friendly gut bacteria so it’s probably a two way street,’’ Romijn says.
 
Researchers believe probiotics helps depression but the UC research, supervised by Associate Professor Julia Rucklidge, seeks to find out how. Participants in the study will be screened via www.mentalhealthandnutrition.co.nz.


Amy Romijn with probiotics

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Scoop Business: RBNZ Starts Talks On Tougher Rules For Property Speculators

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand is stepping up preparations to restrict lending to residential property investors as it watches house prices, particularly in Auckland, continue to rise strongly. More>>

ALSO:

Research: ‘Ageing Well’ Science Challenge Launched

Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce today launched the Ageing Well National Science Challenge, confirming initial funding of $14.6 million. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Govt Resisting Pressure To Pump More Cash Into Solid Energy

Prime Minister John Key says it is “not the government’s preferred option” to make a fresh capital injection into the troubled state-owned coal miner, Solid Energy, but dodged journalists’ questions at his weekly press conference on whether that might prove necessary... More>>

ALSO:

Lagest Ever Privacy Breach Award: NZCU Baywide Accepts “Severe” Censure In Cake Case

NZCU Baywide says that once it was found to have committed a breach of a former staff member’s privacy, it had attempted to resolve the matter... the censure and remedies for its actions taken almost three years ago are “severe” but accepted, and will hopefully draw a line under the matter. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: PayPal Stops Processing Mega Payments; NZX Listing Still On

PayPal has ceased processing payments for Mega, the file storage and encryption firm looking to join the New Zealand stock market via a reverse listing of TRS Investments, amid claims it is not a legitimate cloud storage service. More>>

ALSO:

Housing Policy: Auckland Densification As Popular As Ebola, English Says

Finance Minister Bill English said calls by the Reserve Bank Governor for more densification in Auckland’s housing were “about as popular in parts of Auckland as Ebola” would be. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news