Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


What If People Were Complacent About Tsunamis?

What If People Were Complacent About Tsunamis? Australian Expert Asks
 

May 3, 2013
 
A visiting Australian expert will give a public lecture at the University of Canterbury (UC) next week about the threat of tsunamis.
 
Professor James Goff of the University of New South Wales in Sydney is a visiting Erskine lecturer at UC and will talk about tsunamis at his lecture next Wednesday (May 8). The Erskine fellowship programme was established in 1963 following a generous bequest left by former distinguished UC student John Erskine.
 
Professor Goff says local and regional authorities are still only just waking up to the fact that their coastlines are exposed but they don't really know how bad things could be when a tsunami hits New Zealand’s shores.
 
``Eighty-five percent of all historically documented tsunamis have occurred in the Pacific region and while scientists are still pretty much scratching the surface when it comes to understanding how bad these events have been over the past few thousand years, New Zealand is well ahead of the game and has one of the most comprehensive geological records of tsunamis in the world.
 
``Once you start looking back over the past few thousand years, the greatest number of tsunamis found at any one site in New Zealand is on the West Coast, not the east coast as most people suspect,’’ Professor Goff says.
 
In the lecture, he will ask if it is true that the Japanese were unprepared for the 2011 tsunami and what does New Zealand ignore at its peril?
 
``Tsunamis can be catastrophic and events such as the recent Tohoku-oki disaster in Japan show us just how bad they can be.
 
``However, all is not lost because many researchers are now producing detailed tsunami hazard assessments that are there to help manage such events. The important thing though is to know how good those assessments really are – we do not want to be lulled into a false sense of security, but equally we do not want to hit the panic button.
 
``My focus is primarily to wake up a few more people to the tsunami hazard in New Zealand. Since the relatively minor 2010 Chile earthquake that sent New Zealand a long distance tsunami, some local and regional authorities have been waking up to how bad things could be.
 
 ``We need to seriously understand the nature of the tsunami hazard for New Zealand's coast. We don't know when they are going to happen, but we do know that they will - so let's know as much as we can about the nature of this beast,’’ Professor Goff says.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news