Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search


Research predicts the future of leisure

Research predicts the future of leisure

Seeing a 3D hologram version of Elvis perform at music festivals of the future is no freakish sci-fi vision of the future, says Victoria University Associate Professor Ian Yeoman.

The British-born futurologist, who specialises in travel and tourism, says virtual experiences like these are set to become the norm as technology improves to make a hologram performance look, feel and sound even better than the real thing.

“Right now the best scientists in the world are working with global technology giants to devise technologies that will revolutionise the entertainment industry and completely transform how we experience leisure,” he says.
Professor Yeoman is about to publish research on the topic in a new book called The Future of Events and Festivals.

“In my research, I predict a quantum leap in how consumers spend their downtime. We’re about to see the stuff of science fiction become reality through ground-breaking technologies like Samsung’s mind-reading tablet and Google Glass.”

Professor Yeoman’s research takes a dozen examples of the new ‘play’ technologies and applies them to the Glastonbury festival, which opens in the United Kingdom today, decades into the future, using a method known as scenario planning.

He envisions concert-goers using mind control technology to order food and drink and wearing digital clothing to enhance the sensory effect of a stage performance.

In his ultra-modern scenario, 25-year-old Bridgette Wilson uses a high-tech gadget to record a show as she watches it, remix it with music from the internet and, finally, imbue it with real human emotions.

“I focus on Glastonbury in 2050 for a couple of reasons. First, data shows the festival is becoming more and more popular—evidence that people are continuing to seek out authentic, immersive social experiences.

“Second, we’re seeing people increasingly use experiences like Glastonbury to build up their cultural capital, to express their sense of identity and to tell stories about themselves.

“We know today’s Glastonbury audience wants escape, fun and fantasy. But we also know they’re using smartphones and social media to connect with other people while they’re immersed in their experience and to interact with, and critique, the event in real time.”

Professor Yeoman says that as the world’s largest, most iconic music festival, any change in audience behaviour at Glastonbury is relevant to the travel and tourism industries worldwide.

Professor Yeoman’s research also looks at the emerging technology of digital tattoos.

“They’re mini computers that never need recharging because they are implanted beneath the skin and powered by converting the oxygen and glucose of your bloodstream into energy.

“In my scenario, a concert-goer would use their digital tattoo to send messages and upload images of the concert to the internet—as someone might do using a smartphone today.”

Professor Yeoman and Dr Karen Smith, a Senior Lecturer in Victoria’s School of Management, will give a free public lecture at 12.30pm today on the future of events and festivals. The lunchtime lecture coincides with the opening of this year’s Glastonbury festival in the United Kingdom.

Lecture Title: The Future of Music Festivals: Play, Technology and Glastonbury
Date: Wednesday 26 June
Time: 12.30pm
Venue: Victoria University Pipitea Campus, Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom, 23 Lambton Quay, Wellington


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Trade: NZ Trade Deficit Widens To A Record In September

Oct. 27 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's monthly trade deficit widened to a record in September as meat exports dropped to their lowest level in more than three years. More>>


Animal Welfare: Cruel Practices Condemned By DairyNZ Chief

DairyNZ chief executive Tim Mackle says cruel and illegal practices are not in any way condoned or accepted by the industry as part of dairy farming.

Tim says the video released today by Farmwatch shows some footage of transport companies and their workers, as well as some unacceptable behaviour by farmers of dragging calves. More>>


Postnatal Depression: 'The Thief That Steals Motherhood' - Alison McCulloch

Post-natal depression is a sly and cruel illness, described by one expert as ‘the thief that steals motherhood’, it creeps up on its victims, hiding behind the stress and exhaustion of being a new parent, catching many women unaware and unprepared. More>>


DIY: Kiwi Ingenuity And Masking Tape Saves Chick

Kiwi ingenuity and masking tape has saved a Kiwi chick after its egg was badly damaged endangering the chick's life. The egg was delivered to Kiwi Encounter at Rainbow Springs in Rotorua 14 days ago by a DOC worker with a large hole in its shell and against all odds has just successfully hatched. More>>


International Trade: Key To Lead Mission To India; ASEAN FTA Review Announced

Prime Minister John Key will lead a trade delegation to India next week, saying the pursuit of a free trade agreement with the protectionist giant is "the primary reason we're going" but playing down the likelihood of early progress. More>>



MYOB: Digital Signatures Go Live

From today, Inland Revenue will begin accepting “digital signatures”, saving businesses and their accountants a huge amount of administration time and further reducing the need for pen and paper in the workplace. More>>

Oil Searches: Norway's Statoil Quits Reinga Basin

Statoil, the Norwegian state-owned oil company, has given up oil and gas exploration in Northland's Reinga Basin, saying the probably of a find was 'too low'. More>>


Modern Living: Auckland Development Blowouts Reminiscent Of Run Up To GFC

The collapse of property developments in Auckland is "almost groundhog day" to the run-up of the global financial crisis in 2007/2008 as banks refuse to fund projects due to blowouts in construction and labour costs, says John Kensington, the author of KPMG's Financial Institutions Performance Survey. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news