Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


New Report Updates NZ’s Exposure to Tsunami

NEWS RELEASE from GNS Science ]30 SEPTEMBER 2013

New Report Updates NZ’s Exposure to Tsunami

A new report on New Zealand’s tsunami hazards shows some parts of our coast are exposed to greater tsunami hazard than previously thought, while the hazard in other coastal regions is the same or even less.

The findings come from a 220-page GNS Science report that was commissioned by the Ministry for Civil Defence and Emergency Management. It updates a 2005 report on New Zealand’s tsunami hazards, also produced by GNS Science.

The report notes that earthquakes in some offshore areas, while not more likely, could be bigger than previously thought.

This is because there is now more uncertainty about the maximum size of earthquakes on plate boundaries. This means that some local and regional tsunamis could be larger than previously estimated.

Therefore, tsunami generated by nearby offshore ruptures now represent a higher threat, while distant tsunami – from across the Pacific - are a smaller threat than shown in the 2005 report.

The main areas where tsunami pose a greater hazard than previously understood are:

·        the coasts of Northland, the northwest part of Auckland, Great Barrier Island, the Coromandel Peninsula, and the Bay of Plenty

·        The North Island’s East Cape and parts of the Wairarapa coast

·        Southland, Stewart Island, Fiordland and Westland.

The estimated maximum tsunami wave heights in some of these areas have increased by about 50 percent.

For the most hazardous areas – Northland, Great Barrier, parts of East Cape and Wairarapa – it is possible that waves could reach 15m above the normal sea level at the shoreline. In contrast, there are parts of the North Island’s west coast where the maximum tsunami height is not expected to exceed 5m.

Report compiler William Power, of GNS Science, said historical evidence showed that dangerous local or regional tsunami occurred in New Zealand every 40 to 50 years on average.

“So it is likely that at least one such event will occur in the lifetime of most New Zealanders.”

Dr Power said it was impossible for estimates of size and frequency to be exact. But underplaying the danger would be irresponsible, as it could put people at risk.

The report incorporates information gathered on the 2004 Indian Ocean, 2009 South Pacific, and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis.

All were produced by quakes that were substantially larger than had been considered likely at those locations.

Scientists believe there are fewer restrictions on the maximum magnitudes of earthquakes that occur at tectonic plate boundaries.

They have developed new scientific models to account for this increased uncertainty about the maximum possible size of earthquakes.

The report, Review of Tsunami Hazard in New Zealand (2013 Update),is available on the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management website: http://www.civildefence.govt.nz/

Key points arising from the report: • The probability of a tsunami has not changed, but the maximum possible size of a tsunami in some areas has increased.

• A large tsunami generated very close to New Zealand would arrive before an official warning could be issued.

• People must know that if they are at the coast and feel a strong earthquake (it is hard to stand up) or a weak earthquake that lasts for a minute or more, then get to high ground or go inland. Do not wait for an official warning.

Councils are responsible for warning communities and developing local plans.

.lock.Comparison_between_2005__2013_reports.doc

END

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Keep Digging: Seabed Ironsands Miner TransTasman Tries Again

The first company to attempt to gain a resource consent to mine ironsands from the ocean floor in New Zealand's Exclusive Economic Zone has lodged a new application containing fresh scientific and other evidence it hopes will persuade regulators after their initial application was turned down in 2014. More>>

Wool Pulled: Duvets Sold As ‘Premium Alpaca’ Mostly Sheep’s Wool

Rotorua business Budge Collection Limited (Budge) and sole director, Sun Dong Kim, were convicted and fined a total of $71,250 in Auckland District Court after each pleading guilty to four charges of misrepresenting how much alpaca fibre was in their duvets. More>>

Reserve Bank: Labour Calls For Monetary Policy To Expand Goals

Labour's comments follow a speech today by RBNZ governor Graeme Wheeler in which Wheeler sought to answer critics who variously say he should stop lowering interest rates, lower them faster, or that inflation-targeting should no longer be the primary goal of the central bank's activities. More>>

ALSO:

BSA Extension And Sunday Morning Ads: Digital Convergence Bill Captures Online Content

Broadcasting Minister Amy Adams has today announced the Government’s plans to update the Broadcasting Act to better reflect today’s converged market... The Government considered four areas as part of its review into content regulation: classification requirements, advertising restrictions, election programming and contestable funding. More>>

ALSO:

March 2017: Commerce Commission Delays Decision On Fairfax-NZME

The Commerce Commission has delayed its decision on the proposed merger between NZME and Fairfax Media's New Zealand assets, saying the deal is complex and it needs more time to assess the impact on both news content and the advertising market. More>>

ALSO:

Plan Plan: Permanent Independent Hearings Panel Proposed For Planning

The Productivity Commission recommends creating a permanent independent hearings panel like the one that cut through local politics to settle Auckland’s Unitary Plan, for the whole country. More>>

ALSO:

Statistics: NZ Jobless Rate Falls To 5.1% Under New Methodology

New Zealand's unemployment rate fell more than expected in the second quarter as Statistics New Zealand adopted a new way of measuring the labour market to bring the country in line with international practices, and while a growing economy continued to support jobs growth. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news