Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


World class research into pancreatitis earns award


22nd October 2013

World class research into pancreatitis earns award

Outstanding research into the management of acute pancreatitis by the Pancreas Research Group at the University of Auckland has earned the Royal Society’s 2013 Hamilton Memorial Prize.

The prize was awarded recently to Dr Max Petrov, a Senior Lecturer in Surgery, working with Professor John Windsor at the University’s Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences.

The Royal Society’s citation states that Dr Petrov “has an outstanding research record through initiating and delivering studies which have changed the way that acute pancreatitis, a common digestive disease, is managed…”

One of Dr Petrov’s key achievements was devising and validating an evidence-based classification system to accurately stratify severity of patients with a view to the development of specific therapies for this disease.

Acute pancreatitis is the most frequent disease of the pancreas that bears considerable morbidity and mortality. There is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis, as it is entirely dependent on supportive measures.

“Dr Petrov demonstrated that infected pancreatic necrosis and organ failure are independently associated with high mortality in acute pancreatitis and are equivalent determinants of severity,” says the citation.

“For the first time, Dr Petrov demonstrated that the risk of death doubles when both pancreatic infection and organ failure are present, thus proving that there is an interaction between local and systemic determinants of severity.”

From this seminal study, a new international multidisciplinary classification of severity was developed to accurately stratify severity of patients.

The publication of a new classification of acute pancreatitis severity as a feature article in the premier surgical journal has met with significant international acclaim and it has been translated into several languages.

The Hamilton Memorial Prize was established in memory of Augustus Hamilton, President of the New Zealand Institute 1909 – 1910, and was awarded for the first time in 1923. The award is made annually for the encouragement of early career research in New Zealand or in the islands of the South Pacific Ocean.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news