Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Highlighting impact of environment in shaping future health

LigginsLogo_Positive_RGB.jpg
Media release
27 November 2013

Early life matters

Public forum will highlight impact of environment in shaping future health.

The importance of early life events in shaping future health and wellbeing was recognised in the Report of the Parliamentary Health Committee on the “Inquiry into improving child health outcomes and preventing child abuse, with a focus on preconception until three years of age” released last week.

The report cited research evidence from the Liggins Institute, amongst others, as supporting the focus on this critical period of development.

One example of this type of evidence comes from new research by Liggins Institute researchers, published just last week in the science journal PLOS ONE, which showed that adults, particularly men, who were born preterm are fatter than those born at term.

The research study found that men in their mid-thirties who were born before 37 weeks’ gestation were on average 20 kg heavier than a matched group born at full term. The preterm group also had significantly increased BMIs, a higher proportion of abdominal fat and less favourable lipid profiles.

In turn, children born at term to parents (both male and female) who were born preterm tended to have more body fat, with a greater distribution of abdominal fat, compared with the children whose parents were born at term.

The long-term legacy of the early life environment forms the basis for discussion at a public forum hosted by the Liggins Institute on Friday 29 November. “Womb to wellness – a conversation with our community” provides an opportunity for the Auckland public to join in discussion with leading researchers at the Liggins Institute and hear comments from community leaders on how research evidence is being translated into new care practices and communication strategies to improve the health of current and future generations.

The forum will be chaired by columnist and commentator Rod Oram with speakers: Liggins Institute Professors Sir Peter Gluckman, Jane Harding, Wayne Cutfield and David Cameron-Smith, LENScience Director Jacquie Bay, Mayor of Auckland Len Brown, Children’s Commissioner Dr Russell Wills and Dame Jenny Gibbs.

The forum follows the opening of the Liggins Institute on the University of Auckland’s Redeveloped Grafton Campus by Hon. Steven Joyce, Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment and Minister of Science and Innovation.

Details:

Friday 29 November
University Grafton Campus, 85 Park Road

9.45am Opening of the Liggins Institute on the Redeveloped Grafton Campus

11.15am – 1.15pm “Womb to wellness – a conversation with our community”


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news