Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Turbulent times

Turbulent times
Hoping for a smooth flight into Wellington? NIWA scientists can help.

In the latest issue of NIWA’s flagship magazine Water & Atmosphere, our meteorologists offer some tips for picking the best time to fly into the capital.

They say avoid spring – or at least pick a southerly rather than a northerly. That’s because, contrary to popular belief, airflow is generally rougher in a northerly because of the way it gets churned up over land.

Hot on the heels of an exceptionally windy October, which put Wellington Airport in the record books for the most number of cancelled flights in a single month, they also explain what causes turbulence and why Wellington happens to be so windy.

Spring is always the windiest season, as the graph of NIWA data attached shows, but this October wind gusts were stronger than 60km/h at Wellington Airport for two-thirds of the month. Usually the average is about half.

That prompted 430 flight cancellations in a month when the average is 96. Incidentally, of the 10 strongest winds to hit Wellington in the past decade, three have occurred in the past 15 months.

The latest Water & Atmosphere also explores the science involved in counting fish which aids understanding of the impact recreational fishers can have on major inshore fish stocks.

And we focus on a North Canterbury farmer whose property has become the “poster farm” for precision agriculture. Craige Mackenzie has developed a close relationship with NIWA hydrologists who are helping him boost farm efficiency and sustainability using science and technology.

NIWA marine biologist Wendy Nelson also shares her passion for seaweeds and explains how these clever, versatile algae feed millions of marine creatures, provide at least half the earth’s oxygen and stop the chocolate in your chocolate milkshake from sinking to the bottom.

Dr Nelson’s new book, New Zealand Seaweeds: An Illustrated Guide, is the first photographic identification guide to this country’s unique marine algae and includes more than 500 illustrations.

Water & Atmosphere also looks at the weather for summer and includes the award-winning photographs from NIWA’s annual photographic competition.

The magazine is available at www.niwa.co.nz/publications/wa

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Strike: Lyttelton Port Workers Vote To Escalate Dispute

Members of the Rail and Maritime Transport Union (RMTU) at Lyttelton Port today voted to escalate their industrial action. Around 200 RMTU members have been operating an overtime ban since 17 December and today they endorsed a series of full withdrawals of labour at the port. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: NZ Dollar Falls To 3-Year Low As Investors Favour Greenback

The New Zealand dollar fell to its lowest in more than three years as investors sold euro and bought US dollars, weakening other currencies against the greenback. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: NZ Govt Operating Deficit Smaller Than Expected

The New Zealand’s government’s operating deficit was smaller than expected in the first five months of the financial year as a clampdown on expenditure managed to offset a shortfall in the tax-take from last month’s forecast. More>>

ALSO:

0.8 Percent Annually:
NZ Inflation Falls Below RBNZ's Target

New Zealand's annual pace of inflation slowed to below the Reserve Bank's target band in the final three months of the year, giving governor Graeme Wheeler more room to keep the benchmark interest rate lower for longer.More>>

ALSO:

NASA, NOAA: Find 2014 Warmest Year In Modern Record

Since 1880, Earth’s average surface temperature has warmed by about 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit (0.8 degrees Celsius), a trend that is largely driven by the increase in carbon dioxide and other human emissions into the planet’s atmosphere. The majority of that warming has occurred in the past three decades. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: New Zealand’s Reserve Bank Named Central Bank Of The Year

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s efforts to stifle house price inflation by using new policy tools has seen the institution named Central Bank of the year by Central Banking Publications, a publisher specialising in global central banking practice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news