Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search


QEII covenantors get funding boost for conservation projects

30 January 2014

QEII covenantors get funding boost to support conservation projects

QEII National Trust covenantors will be able to do more for New Zealand’s biodiversity with $313,000 worth of grants received from DOC’s latest Biofund round.

Trust funding co-ordinator, Genevieve Bannister, said 12 projects on Trust covenanted land have been given the go ahead for a range of conservation initiatives now that funding support has been secured.

Funding was prioritised to support projects which specifically covered national priorities for protecting rare and threatened native biodiversity on private land. The grants will support a range of projects including weed and pest control and threatened plant monitoring and propagation in a number of sites around New Zealand, and restoration programmes in wetlands located in Southland and Hawke’s Bay.

“Our covenantors do amazing work voluntarily protecting New Zealand’s native biodiversity on their land, but sometimes the scale of the task or the nature of the work is just too expensive, too urgent or too problematic for them to manage on their own.

“It is such a thrill when a grant application is accepted and we get the funding support needed to help them get on with the job,” she said.

Ms Bannister said many of New Zealand’s threatened plants and animals are found on private land, so protecting them there is as vital as it is on public conservation land. Since 2002 over 360 projects in covenants have been assisted with Biofunds grants.

“We have managed to secure on average $8,000 per project which makes a huge difference to what can be achieved.

“Biofunds recognises the importance of conservation efforts on private land and we are thankful for the support the fund gives to covenantors who are protecting biodiversity for the benefit of all New Zealand,” Ms Bannister said.

The QEII National Trust works in partnership with landowners to help them protect special natural and cultural sites on their land in perpetuity with open space covenants.

Since its inception in 1977, National Trust covenantors have established some 4,000 covenants which collectively protect around 125,000 ha of New Zealand’s natural and cultural heritage, an area equivalent in size to the combined areas of the Abel Tasman, Aoraki/Mt Cook and Taranaki/Egmont national parks.

Covenantors are encouraged to contact their local QEII representative to discuss external funding options for conservation projects in their covenants.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Shocking Dairy Footage: MPI Failing Our Animals And Damaging Our Reputation

Greens “Nathan Guy needs to urgently look into how his ministry is enforcing animal welfare standards, how these appalling incidents happened under its watch and what it’s going to do prevent similar incidents happening again in the future." More>>


Land & Water Forum: Fourth Report On Water Management

The Land and Water Forum (LWF) today published its fourth report, outlining 60 new consensus recommendations for how New Zealand should improve its management of fresh water and calling on the Government to urgently adopt all of its recommendations from earlier reports. More>>



Welcome Home: Record High Migration Stokes 41-Year High Population Growth

New Zealand annual net migration hit a new high in October as more people arrived from than departed for Australia for the first time in more than 20 years. More>>


Citizens' Advice Bureau: Report Shows Desperate Housing Situation Throughout NZ

CAB's in-depth analysis of over 2000 client enquiries about emergency accommodation shows vulnerable families, pregnant women and children living in cars and garages, even after seeking assistance from the Ministry of Social Development and Housing New Zealand. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news