Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

Newly discovered microbe holds key to global warming

Scientists from The University of Queensland have discovered a microbe that is set to play a significant role in future global warming.

UQ's Australian Centre for Ecogenomics researcher Ben Woodcroft said the methane-producing micro-organism, known as a ‘methanogen’, was thriving in northern Sweden’s thawing permafrost in a thick subsurface layer of soil that has previously remained frozen.

Mr Woodcroft said no one knew of the microbe’s existence or how it worked before the research discovery.

He said global warming trends meant vast areas of permafrost would continue to thaw, allowing the microbes to flourish in organic matter and drive methane gas release, which would further fuel global warming.

“The micro-organism generates methane by using carbon dioxide and hydrogen from the bacteria it lives alongside,” Mr Woodcroft said.

Lead researcher and UQ’s Australian Centre for Ecogenomics Deputy Director Associate Professor Gene Tyson said the findings were significant.
“This micro-organism is responsible for producing a substantial fraction of methane at this site,” he said.

“Methane is a potent greenhouse gas with about 25 times the warming capacity of carbon dioxide.”

The researchers showed the organism and its close relatives live not just in thawing permafrost but in many other methane-producing habitats worldwide.

The team made the discovery by using DNA from soil samples and reconstructing a near-complete genome of the microbe, bypassing traditional methods of cultivating microbes in the lab.

The ‘Discovery of a novel methanogen prevalent in thawing permafrost’ research is published here in the journal Nature Communications.

The work was funded by the United States Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research’s Genomic Science Program and the Australian Research Council

ENDS



© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Workers “Blind-Sided”: Sanford Processing Restructure Plan

Up to 30 jobs – almost half Sanford’s Bluff workforce - could be lost if the proposal to move white-fish processing to Timaru goes ahead. More>>

up arrow"Steady": GDP Up 0.6 Percent In March Quarter

“Construction was the main contributor to GDP growth this quarter, rising 3.7 percent, on top of a 2.2 percent increase in the previous quarter,” national accounts senior manager Gary Dunnet said. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Our Wild West Banking Culture

David Hisco’s nine year stint as CEO of the ANZ bank (while his expense claim eccentricities went by unbothered by board oversight) has been a weird echo of the nine years of social neglect by the previous National government... More>>

ALSO:

Privacy & Regulation Issues: Hopes Facebook Currency Will Speed Pacific Transfers

A Tongan community leader is hopeful Facebook's planned digital currency will help end long wait times for money being transferred between New Zealand and the Pacific Islands. More>>

Oil Exploration: Chevron, Equinor Depart NZ

Chevron and Norwegian oil giant Equinor have opted to abandon their joint exploration efforts off the east coast of the North Island... Chevron said the decision not to proceed with the next five-year stage of their work programmes was based on the firms’ broader portfolio considerations and not “policy or regulatory concerns.” More>>

ALSO: