Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


NZ International Science Festival 2014: Leave boring behind

February 27 2014

NZ International Science Festival 2014 to ‘leave boring behind’

Leave boring behind – a celebration of all things exciting and fun about science – is the message behind this year’s New Zealand International Science Festival to be held 5 to 13 July in Dunedin.

Featuring an incredible line-up of events for young and old, including expos, stunts, street science, debates, interactive demonstrations and inspiring workshops with world leaders in science innovation, this year’s festival will build on the success of previous years and deliver an exciting programme which shows why science matters – from the everyday to the Big Questions.

“As well as being a science festival, it is a playground,” says new Festival Associate Director (and former Festival Projects Director) Rieke Lamb.

“Science is amazing. You don’t have to exclude anything, you can go in any direction – everything in our lives has a link to science.”

Rieke Lamb returns to Dunedin after four years in her home country Germany, where she worked in a variety of roles including HR, event management and social media. Her most recent job was as Social Media Manager for Europe’s largest cultural centre, where she was involved in running multiple large-scale events – many of them with a focus on music and young people.

Rieke first moved to Dunedin in 2006 after she produced a student research seminar on New Zealand and its economy that made her want to come here. She became the Festival’s Projects Director during the 2008 Festival and worked on the 2010 Festival until she returned to Germany with her partner, Sports Biomechanics Lecturer at the University of Otago, Peter Lamb.

“I love this festival and am excited about creating events that engage all communities and people.”

New Zealand International Science Festival director Chris Green says the message for this year’s festival to ‘leave boring behind’ will inform all aspects of the festival’s programme.

“We have always been about showing why science is great, why it matters and why it is fun. But this year, more than ever, boring is ‘out’ and exciting, interactive events which showcase discovery, creativity and the really cool places science can take you are in.”

The festival programme will launch in late May, with tickets on sale from early June. Announcements of key international guests will be made in coming months, but past guests have included NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson, science communicator Chris K-P, and Sir Ray Avery, and organisers promise to continue to deliver world leaders in their fields.

Festival president Dr Michele Coleman says: “Science is an essential part of our world, and the Festival shows why science matters – from the everyday to the extraordinary.”

W: www.scifest.org.nz
F: https://www.facebook.com/nzscifest
T: @NZSciFest

Background www.scifest.org.nz
The New Zealand International Science Festival has developed, managed and produced seven International Science Festivals in Dunedin every two years since 1998. In addition to a wide range of events, the festivals involve the participation of international guests, national and local experts and a range of local and national sponsors and funders.

Up to 40 individual volunteers help run festival events, and thousands of visitors from all over New Zealand participate in festival activities.
The NZ International Science Festival is a not-for-profit organisation, which aims:
• To promote and celebrate science, technology and the environment to a wide general audience, and show that science is exciting, fun, and accessible
• To encourage young people to consider working in the fields of science, technology and the environment as positive career options
• To show the relevance of current developments in science and technology to our daily lives
• To promote the quality and achievements of New Zealand scientific research

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Reserve Bank: Wheeler Keeps OCR At 1.75%

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler kept the official cash rate unchanged at 1.75 percent, as expected, and reiterated his view that the benchmark rate doesn't need shifting for the foreseeable future. More>>

ALSO:

Retail: Pumpkin Patch Brand, IP Sold To Catch Group

The receivers of failed children's clothing retailer Pumpkin Patch have confirmed that the company's brand and intellectual property have been sold to Australian online retailer Catch Group. More>>

ALSO:

Oil: 2017 Block Offer Petroleum Tender Launched

New Zealand is well-placed to take advantage of the economic benefits of oil and gas exploration, Energy and Resources Minister Judith Collins announced today at the launch of the 2017 Block Offer petroleum tender. More>>

ALSO:

OECD And Zero Carbon Reports: Environmental Pressures Rising In New Zealand

New Zealanders enjoy a high environmental quality of life and access to pristine wilderness. However, New Zealand’s growth model, based largely on exploiting natural resources, is starting to show its environmental limits with increasing greenhouse gas emissions and water pollution ... More>>

ALSO:

Statistics: Record Net Annual Migration Levels Continue

In the February 2017 year, 71,300 more migrants arrived in New Zealand than left, Stats NZ said today. This equalled the previous annual record set in January 2017. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news