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NZ International Science Festival 2014: Leave boring behind

February 27 2014

NZ International Science Festival 2014 to ‘leave boring behind’

Leave boring behind – a celebration of all things exciting and fun about science – is the message behind this year’s New Zealand International Science Festival to be held 5 to 13 July in Dunedin.

Featuring an incredible line-up of events for young and old, including expos, stunts, street science, debates, interactive demonstrations and inspiring workshops with world leaders in science innovation, this year’s festival will build on the success of previous years and deliver an exciting programme which shows why science matters – from the everyday to the Big Questions.

“As well as being a science festival, it is a playground,” says new Festival Associate Director (and former Festival Projects Director) Rieke Lamb.

“Science is amazing. You don’t have to exclude anything, you can go in any direction – everything in our lives has a link to science.”

Rieke Lamb returns to Dunedin after four years in her home country Germany, where she worked in a variety of roles including HR, event management and social media. Her most recent job was as Social Media Manager for Europe’s largest cultural centre, where she was involved in running multiple large-scale events – many of them with a focus on music and young people.

Rieke first moved to Dunedin in 2006 after she produced a student research seminar on New Zealand and its economy that made her want to come here. She became the Festival’s Projects Director during the 2008 Festival and worked on the 2010 Festival until she returned to Germany with her partner, Sports Biomechanics Lecturer at the University of Otago, Peter Lamb.

“I love this festival and am excited about creating events that engage all communities and people.”

New Zealand International Science Festival director Chris Green says the message for this year’s festival to ‘leave boring behind’ will inform all aspects of the festival’s programme.

“We have always been about showing why science is great, why it matters and why it is fun. But this year, more than ever, boring is ‘out’ and exciting, interactive events which showcase discovery, creativity and the really cool places science can take you are in.”

The festival programme will launch in late May, with tickets on sale from early June. Announcements of key international guests will be made in coming months, but past guests have included NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson, science communicator Chris K-P, and Sir Ray Avery, and organisers promise to continue to deliver world leaders in their fields.

Festival president Dr Michele Coleman says: “Science is an essential part of our world, and the Festival shows why science matters – from the everyday to the extraordinary.”

W: www.scifest.org.nz
F: https://www.facebook.com/nzscifest
T: @NZSciFest

Background www.scifest.org.nz
The New Zealand International Science Festival has developed, managed and produced seven International Science Festivals in Dunedin every two years since 1998. In addition to a wide range of events, the festivals involve the participation of international guests, national and local experts and a range of local and national sponsors and funders.

Up to 40 individual volunteers help run festival events, and thousands of visitors from all over New Zealand participate in festival activities.
The NZ International Science Festival is a not-for-profit organisation, which aims:
• To promote and celebrate science, technology and the environment to a wide general audience, and show that science is exciting, fun, and accessible
• To encourage young people to consider working in the fields of science, technology and the environment as positive career options
• To show the relevance of current developments in science and technology to our daily lives
• To promote the quality and achievements of New Zealand scientific research

ENDS

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