Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


New Zealand Medical Tech At Heart Of Australian Stroke Hub

Ground-Breaking New Zealand Medical Tech At Heart Of Australian Stroke Hub

A collaborative project between Callaghan Innovation and Lower Hutt company Im-Able has led to a ground-breaking trial at Royal Melbourne Hospital of specialised technology that can speed up the recovery of stroke victims.

The Australian trial, led by Professor Mary Galea, incorporates Im-Able’s technology into the hospital’s provision of care in a dedicated ‘Hand Hub’ established within the hospital. The Hand Hub is part of a clinical study that aims to assess the benefits of intensive upper limb rehabilitation immediately following a stroke.

Callaghan Innovation’s medical devices team worked in partnership with Im-Able to develop and commercialise a platform that enables stroke survivors to play games that are designed to retrain their brains and recover the use of their arms and hands at a much faster rate than traditional one-on-one therapy. In earlier trials the system has been shown to benefit stroke patients several years after their injury.

Callaghan Innovation human movement scientist Dr Kimberlee Jordan says positive results from the Melbourne trial would encourage hospitals here and overseas to implement the Im-Able system as a routine part of a stroke patient’s recovery programme.

“Stroke is the leading cause of ongoing adult disability, with most patients failing to recover full independence. This is a prime example of how we at Callaghan Innovation can work with business to generate results that have a high value impact in a key sector,” she says.

“While we’ve already seen a lot of individual success stories in New Zealand, for hospitals to invest in new technology they want to see evidence that it is the best use of their resources. One of the most important things is simply showing that a new technology can be incorporated into the provision of everyday care. Connecting with Professor Galea to run a large-scale study will provide the data that health providers need to decide whether to make this technology available to all stroke patients.”

A standard clinical trial for a rehabilitation technology might involve 20 patients. At Royal Melbourne Hospital several hundred could undertake a 10-week treatment plan at the Hand Hub this year, with some patients already beginning on Im-Able’s equipment within the first 2 or 3 days after a stroke.

Im-Able chief executive Elliott Kernohan says the year-long trial is hugely significant, as it will provide further evidence of how his company’s technology can improve patient recovery rates and reduce the pressure on hospital resources.

“There’s increasing pressure within the hospital system on length of stay, which means that the rehabilitation teams have even less time to spend one-on-one working with patients who need their expertise. And it’s often the arms and hands that get less attention. The Hand Hub study has implemented our system to ask what happens when you employ easy-to-use technologies that let patients use their time in hospital more productively, helping them get further along in their recovery journey, and supporting an earlier return home. Those outcomes will hopefully reduce the longer term costs of care as well.” Mr Kernohan says.

“By collaborating with Callaghan Innovation’s experts we’ve been able to advance this technology and turn it into a commercially viable solution.

“We know our device works. But what’s important in healthcare – and to us – is to be able to actually improve the delivery of care. That means better and more sustainable patient outcomes while using up fewer hospital resources. When we think of this as a solution to that problem, we get incredibly excited about what we can achieve.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Post-Post: Brian Roche To Step Down As NZ Post CEO

Brian Roche will step down as chief executive of New Zealand Post in April 2017, having led the state-owned postal service's drive to adjust to shrinking mail volumes with a combination of cost cuts, asset sales, modernisation and expansion of new businesses. More>>

ALSO:

Company Results: Air NZ Rides The Tourism Boom With Record Full-Year Earnings

Air New Zealand has ridden the tourism boom and staved off increased competition to deliver the best full-year earnings in its 76-year history. More>>

ALSO:

New PGP: Sheep Milk Industry Gets $12.6M Crown Funding

The Sheep - Horizon Three programme aims to develop "a market driven, end-to-end value chain generating annual revenues of between $200 million and $700 million by 2030," according to a joint statement. More>>

ALSO:

Half Full: Fonterra Raises Forecast Milk Price

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited today increased its 2016/17 forecast Farmgate Milk Price by 50 cents to $4.75 per kgMS. When combined with the forecast earnings per share range for the 2017 financial year of 50 to 60 cents, the total payout available to farmers in the current season is forecast to be $5.25 to $5.35 before retentions. More>>

ALSO:

Keep Digging: Seabed Ironsands Miner TransTasman Tries Again

The first company to attempt to gain a resource consent to mine ironsands from the ocean floor in New Zealand's Exclusive Economic Zone has lodged a new application containing fresh scientific and other evidence it hopes will persuade regulators after their initial application was turned down in 2014. More>>

Wool Pulled: Duvets Sold As ‘Premium Alpaca’ Mostly Sheep’s Wool

Rotorua business Budge Collection Limited (Budge) and sole director, Sun Dong Kim, were convicted and fined a total of $71,250 in Auckland District Court after each pleading guilty to four charges of misrepresenting how much alpaca fibre was in their duvets. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news