Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search


Healthy choices critical for healthy lifestyle

Healthy choices critical for healthy lifestyle of New Zealanders, UC expert says

Health information on New Zealand’s food labels is poor in helping people decide what is healthy or not, a University of Canterbury (UC) marketing expert says.

Associate Professor Ekant Veer says New Zealand has a great reputation for being open about what is in the food and drinks they buy in shops and supermarkets.

``Labels show all the ingredients and all the nutritional information, the problem is many people in New Zealand are not able to understand what is good for them and what is not.

``They may have an impression of what is good or bad but actually making a coherent decision as a result of the label information is not as effective.’’

Professor Veer will give the first UC What if Wednesday public lecture of the year on campus next week (March 12) to talk about how health campaigns can be improved. See here for details:

He and his team have researched different ways to provide more effective, healthier choices for consumers and ways to drive behavioural change, rather than just educating people about what is right or wrong.

``Knowing what the right thing to do is far different from actually doing the right thing. Many people know that smoking or binge drinking is not good for their health, but continue to do so.”

``In my work, I look to understand far more about how and why people’s behaviour doesn’t change and use this as a basis for encouraging positive behavioural change.

``As the overwhelmingly high obesity rates in New Zealand continue to climb, something needs to be done to improve the health of our society. Our research provides us with valuable insight into understanding consumption behaviours associated with food labels. New Zealand still has one of the highest obesity rates in the world.

`` Making people care about their health and care about making healthy choices is also needed to encourage a healthier life. Education is not just good enough. We need to do more than that and will explain what should be done in the lecture.

``My talk will help those working in health promotion and also those looking to understand behavioural change practices and consumer welfare.”

See a YouTube preview of Professor Veer’s lecture here:


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news