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Danish company Brain+ launches app that trains the brain

Danish company Brain+ now launches a powerful app that trains the brain

The Brain+ app contains a number of scientifically designed, yet fun and motivating, brain training games that improve the key mental capabilities in the areas of attention, memory, problem solving and planning. The Brain+ exercises are developed in collaboration with leading brain scientists from Copenhagen University and is suitable for people of all ages. A recent pilot launch in Denmark quickly resulted in downloads by more than 1 % of the Danish adult population. The app is now available for iPhone and iPad and can be downloaded and tried for free.

“Sorry, what was your name again?”

Do you know the feeling? Memory is an essential part of social interaction, and not being able to remember a person’s name or job can be terribly embarrassing. However, a recent scientific study has shown that an 80-year old can achieve the same performance on attention and memory tasks as a 20-year old, with just 4 weeks of training, 30 minutes a day - using a scientifically designed computer game. With the Brain+ app you will be able to improve several of your brain’s abilities, which will help you in both your career and social life.

“The essence of the Brain+ project is to improve people’s quality of life by helping them to utilize their brain’s full potential and maintain mental sharpness throughout life. This is for people of all ages, and in the future also for the treatment of a range of brain related disorders”, says Kim Baden-Kristensen, co-founder of Brain+.

Playing most games and brain teasers does not do much more than making one better at the particular game. However, scientific studies have shown that core capabilities of the brain can be trained to a radically improved level of mental sharpness throughout life. But this requires the right neuroscientific principles, type of exercise and intensity to be applied in the brain training, which is exactly what the new Brain+ app does.

Skills trained
The current Brain+ app contains three games, which train some of the brain's most vital skills: Attention, memory, planning and problem solving. In one game, Captain's Challenge, the user trains attention and short-term memory in order to steer a ship safely through dangerous waters. In the second game, Remember Me, the user trains long-term memory to get better at remembering personal information about a variety of new people. In the third game, Fresh Frog, the user trains the problem solving-skill and the ability to plan ahead. This happens by trying to navigate an enchanted frog through dangerous swamps to kiss a princess and undo the spell. A number of other brain training games are under development and will be released ongoing.

Very well received in Denmark
The app was recently launched and warmly received in Denmark, where it got known nationwide from national TV and newspapers and quickly passed 30.000 Danish downloads – equaling more than 1 % of the adult population.

One of the reasons for this is that the app ensures that people of all ages can become better and faster at attaining new knowledge, solving problems and executing plans. They can also improve their social intelligence by getting better at remembering people, remembering names and what people are telling them. The brain training exercises are wrapped into engaging games to create maximum motivation, intensity and endurance - and thereby maximum effect for the user.

About Brain+
Brain+ is a Danish brain training company seeking to provide scientifically proven, effective and engaging brain training exercises that intelligently adapt to the specific need and ability of each user. Brain+ works closely with leading brain scientist from Copenhagen University to develop the exercises and scientifically prove the effects.

Read more: www.brain-plus.com

ENDS

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