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New forecasting tool helps offshore engineers make decisions

New weather forecasting tool helps offshore engineers make decisions


MetraWeather has refined a new forecasting technique called DSE (Downscaled Super Ensembles) that can provide pinpoint marine weather and marine forecasts for any location in the world.

DSE is being put to use by MetraWeather’s specialist oceanography team, providing forecasts for four clients in Australia and New Zealand, where wave conditions play a crucial role in their operations.

“DSE lets engineers assess the risk involved with their offshore operations. Five to seven days in advance, we can provide decision-makers with vital information about the potential severity of storms, which provides valuable insights for planning safe operations,” said Peter Fisher, MetraWeather Business Development Manager.

“Our forecasts quantify the probability of certain outcomes. We can assist them to make informed decisions based on the likelihood that specific wave heights will, or will not be, exceeded,” he said.

DSE provides better guidance than standard marine weather forecasting techniques because the likelihood of unfavourable outcomes is quantified.
The forecasts are compiled from multiple global data sources which are then tailored to the exact location of interest, resulting in a cluster of 78 individual wave and wind forecasts for analysis.

Fisher said DSE is robust and has been thoroughly tested. Forecasts can be generated for anywhere on Earth.

“The true benefit of DSE is that it provides the marine and offshore industries with a higher level of confidence for making safe decisions, applying the absolute best available information,” Fisher said.

“With DSE, we’ve embraced the inherent volatility in weather and created an effective tool for decision-makers.”

Ends

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