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Science space nominated for international award

April 2, 2014

Science space nominated for international award

Science laboratories at Massey University's Manawatū campus have been shortlisted in the laboratory-related teaching and learning category in this year's international S-Lab awards, run from Britain.

Massey University is one of only two Australasian universities shortlisted for the awards that will be presented at the "Supporting World Class Science" conference in London in September.

The nomination is for a “total re-think of how teaching lab space and equipment is managed and tailored to a variety of disciplines". The shared science laboratory space can accommodate students dissecting specimens, analysing soil samples or analysing biological signals using physiology software, virtually simultaneously within a single day.

College of Sciences facility manager, Mr Brian Best, says the $4.6 million reconstruction of the laboratories involved a complete culture change. “We’re optimising the use of the laboratory space by shifting to a more collaborative approach between disciplines that is allowing teachers and students to share knowledge and resources.”

The rebuild was completed in 2010 and the facilities now support disciplines including zoology, ecology, plant science, seed science, horticulture, animal science, environmental science, physiology, anatomy, soil and earth sciences, human bioscience, education and vet science.

The S-Lab Conference and Awards are described as a unique initiative to create better linkages between, and highlight best practice amongst, all the key players involved in laboratory design, operation and management. They originated in tertiary education but have growing involvement by public sector and commercial laboratories and suppliers, and are organised by the S-Lab (safe, successful, sustainable laboratories) initiative.

ENDS

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