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Stroke app provides hope in the face of concerning stats

Stroke app provides hope in the face of concerning stroke statistics


Stroke is one of New Zealand’s leading killers. One in six New Zealanders will experience a stroke in their lifetime, many resulting in death or disability, yet how many of us know how to reduce our risk of having a stroke?

Up to 90 per cent of strokes could be prevented if stroke risk factors were managed appropriately. With this in mind, an app developed by an AUT Professor is aiming to reduce the incidence of stroke and save lives around the world.

The Stroke RiskometerTM is the brainchild of AUT University’s Professor Valery Feigin. It was brought to market by AUT Enterprises Ltd, so that its potential health benefits could be shared with vast numbers of people world-wide.

The free Stroke RiskometerTM app enables users to assess their individual stroke risk on a smartphone or tablet. It evaluates factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, family history and lifestyle, and is already being used by health-conscious people in more than 70 countries.

According to Professor Feigin, the Stroke RiskometerTM helps users to play an active role in managing their health.

“We don’t need to wait until stroke strikes – we can act now and take control of our health. Stroke is much easier to prevent than to treat, and by making good lifestyle choices we can reduce our chances of suffering a stroke.”

“The Stroke RiskometerTM helps people to see what impact steps like exercising more, eating a healthier diet and drinking less alcohol are having on their personal risk profile, and helps users to stay motivated and maintain the positive lifestyle changes they choose to make”, says Professor Feigin.

Users seeking additional means of managing their risks can purchase the Stroke RiskometerTM Pro, enabling them to save and track results, share their risk profile with family members and health professionals, and access internationally recognised guidelines on mitigating stroke risk factors.

Professor Feigin says users of the app will not only be taking action against stroke, but will also be managing their risk of experiencing heart disease and dementia.

The Stroke RiskometerTM is endorsed by the World Stroke Organization and is available for download through the Apple App and Google Play stores.

Ends.

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