Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Emissions growing but limiting warming remains possible

Greenhouse gas emissions growing but limiting warming remains possible
STRICTLY EMBARGOED TO 9pm, 13 April, NZ time


On Sunday in Berlin the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a further climate change assessment report. This “Fifth Assessment Working Group 3 report” documents recent trends in greenhouse gas emissions and identifies their sources. It assesses options for reducing emissions of these gases in order to limit future human- induced changes in climate.

The report shows that global greenhouse gas emissions have continued to grow – on average at 2.2% per year between 2000 and 2010. Carbon dioxide remains the major long-lived greenhouse gas emitted as a result of human activities. Economic growth and population growth are the two main drivers of recent increases in global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion. They outpaced gains from producing and using energy more efficiently.

The report considers a wide range of potential scenarios for future greenhouse gas emissions, and concludes that scenarios that limit CO2-equivalent concentrations in 2100 to about 450 parts per million are likely to keep global temperature change below 2°C. It says such scenarios include substantial cuts in anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions by mid-century. (Countries that have ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on ClimateChanges (UNFCCC) have agreed to a long-term goal of keeping global temperature increases below 2°C compared to pre-industrial times).

The report says that without additional efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,emissions growth is expected to persist. But it also identifies and assesses measures and technologies that could assist with reducing emissions. Potential improvements are available through low-carbon energy generation, more energy-efficient transport, buildings and industry, reduced deforestation, bioenergy, better management of cropland and grazing land, and urban planning affecting infrastructure, land use and transport choices.

Dr David Wratt of the NZ Climate Change Centre and NIWA has attended the plenary meetings of all three IPCC Working Groups. He says: “The first two reports of the IPCC Fifth Assessment confirm that climate change poses major problems. This third report shows that our actions to date are not enough to put us on a global track for limiting warming to 2 degrees. But the report also provides options for reducing emissions – and shows that if we make sufficient reductions we can escape some of the more serious impacts that would result from unconstrained climate change”.

Full text of the “Summary for Policymakers” of the IPCC Working Group 3 Report will be available on the IPCC website (www.ipcc.ch). Three New Zealand experts contributed substantially to the report: Professor Ralph Sims of Massey University as a Convening Lead Author of the chapter on Transport, Dr Harry Clark Director of the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre as a Lead Author of the chapter on Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses, and Dr AdamJaffe Director of Motu Economic & Public Policy Research as a Lead Author of the chapter on National and Sub-National Policies.ext of the “Summary for Policymakers” of the IPCC Working Group 3 Report will be available on the IPCC website (www.ipcc.ch). Three New Zealand experts contributed substantially to the report: Professor Ralph Sims of Massey University as a Convening Lead Author of the chapter on Transport, Dr Harry Clark Director of the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre as a Lead Author of the chapter on Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses, and Dr AdamJaffe Director of Motu Economic & Public Policy Research as a Lead Author of the chapter on National and Sub-National Policies.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

What Winter? Temperature Records Set For June 20-22

The days around the winter soltice produced a number of notably warm tempertaures. More>>

Conservation Deal: New Kākāpō Recovery Partnership Welcomed

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says the new kakapo recovery partnership between DOC and Meridian Energy is great news for efforts to save one of New Zealand’s most beloved birds. More>>

ALSO:

Tech Sector Report: Joyce Warns Asian Tech Investors View NZ As Hobbits And Food

Speaking in Wellington at the launch of a report showcasing the value of the technology sector to the New Zealand economy, Joyce said more had to be done to tell the country's technology stories overseas. More>>

ALSO:

Mediaglommeration: APN Gets OIO Approval For Demerger Plan

APN News & Media has received Overseas Investment Office approval for its plan to split out its NZME unit ahead of a potential merger with rival Fairfax Media's New Zealand operations. More>>

New Paper: Ninety-Day Trial Period Has No Impact On Firms' Hiring

The introduction of a 90-day trial period has had no impact on hiring by New Zealand companies although they are now in widespread use, according to researchers at Motu Economic and Public Policy Research. More>>

ALSO:

Corrections: Serco Exits Equity Stake, Remains As Operator

Serco has sold its equity stake in the company that holds the contract to design, build and run Wiri Prison in South Auckland but continues as sub-contractor to operate the facility. More>>

GDP: NZ Economy Grows Faster-Than-Forecast 0.7%

New Zealand's economy grew at a faster pace than expected in the first quarter of 2016 as construction expanded at the quickest rate in two years. The kiwi dollar jumped after the data was released. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news