Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Research focus important for optometry

Research focus important for optometry

It’s vital for optometry students to engage in research and keep up to date with new developments in clinical practice, says Professor Steven Dakin, the new head of Optometry at the University of Auckland.

Professor Dakin was appointed this month, and comes from the Institute of Ophthalmology at University College London and Moorfields Eye Hospital, London.

“I would like to try and strengthen the course to further engender in the students a sense of how important research is to the continued development of optometry,” says Professor Dakin. “My goal is that our department should produce optometrists that are still engaged in science - that they read journals and keep abreast of new developments to inform their practice as clinician scientists.”

“To make this happen I’d like to beef up our clinical research and see students doing more projects that are directly concerned with improving patient well-being and that ultimately lead to publications and grants, “ he says.

“We will be exploring opportunities for continuing professional development for optometrists, including new courses to help them deliver the latest therapies, to use new imaging devices, and to develop specialties around paediatrics and older adults.”

He also sees potential for more collaboration with the departments of both Ophthalmology, and Neurology (via the Centre for Brain Research).

“There are great opportunities here for building even closer ties between optometry and ophthalmology via more clinically oriented research,” says Professor Dakin. “It’s also increasingly clear that understanding disorders like autism and schizophrenia will require an understanding of the associated sensory problems, particularly vision; there are great synergies with neuroscience here.”

He is looking forward to the challenge of continuing to deliver high impact research, published in good journals and on a limited budget, and encouraging his staff and students to do the same.

His specialist area – visual psychophysics – is about measuring human behaviour in order to understand how vision works.

“The science that I do measures the limits of people’s ability to perform simple visual tasks, like reading a letter or recognising a face” he says. “That relates directly to optometry as we use similar disciplines.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Our Fresh Water: Monitoring Report Confirms Serious Challenges For Rivers

• nitrogen levels are getting worse at 55 percent and getting better at 28 percent of monitored river sites across New Zealand • phosphorus levels are getting better at 42 percent and getting worse at 25 percent of monitored river sites across New Zealand More>>

ALSO:

Stats: Wind And Geothermal Emerge As Significant Sources Of Energy

Geothermal’s contribution to New Zealand’s total renewable energy generation increased from 11.5 percent in 2007 to 21 percent in 2015.... The value of wind jumped from $238 million (2 percent of total renewable energy generation) in 2007 to $884 million (6 percent) in 2015. More>>

Errors Found: Electricity Authority Dumps Transmission Pricing Modelling

The Electricity Authority is ditching the cost-benefit analysis at the heart of its controversial attempt to find a new way to divide up costs for the national grid after finding an expanding range of serious computational errors in the work by Australian consultancy Oakley Greenwood. More>>

ALSO:

New Record: Migrant Arrivals At 129,500 A Year

Annual net migration has been steadily increasing since 2012. "This was mainly due to the rising number of migrant arrivals to New Zealand," population statistics senior manager Peter Dolan said. "Fewer migrant departures also contributed to the increase in net migration." More>>

ALSO:

Launched: NASA's Super Pressure Balloon Takes Flight From NZ

NASA successfully launched its football-stadium-sized, heavy-lift super pressure balloon (SPB) from Wanaka, New Zealand, at10:50 a.m. Tuesday, April 25 (6:50 p.m. April 24 in U.S. Eastern Time), on a mission designed to run 100 or more days floating at 110,000 feet (33.5 km) about the globe in the southern hemisphere's mid-latitude band. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news