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And now for a tropical low

And now for a tropical low

Active and unsettled weather will dominate in the run up to Easter,with a low of tropical origin bringing heavy rain and gales for many on Thursday andFriday.

MetService Media and Communications Meteorologist Daniel Corbett commented,"The inbound tropical low will certainly pack a decent punch, with heavy rain, downpours and very strong winds for many parts of the country"

Currently, a slow moving front will bring continuing persistent and heavy rain to parts of central New Zealand during Wednesday before easing slightly by days end.

The centre of the tropical low will stay to the west of the country, but its associated heavy rain band will sweep down across the north of the North Island during Wednesday night into early Thursday. Exposed eastern locations from Northland to the Bay of Plenty could see wind gusts in excess of 110km/h along with torrential downpours for a time. The rain-band will spread across the remainder of the country later Thursday or on Friday. Many eastern locations will feel the brunt of the heavy rain and strong winds as well as some higher than normal seas at high tide. Watches and warnings have been issued for this event, and subtle changes may see other regions added to the already comprehensive list. This deep low will continue moving southwards over the weekend to run away to the south of New Zealand. This will usher in a change to a breezy northwest flow with a mixture of sunshine and showers over the country.

Easter Sunday at this point looks to be a mix of sunshine and a few showers especially in western areas of the country.

There will no doubt be some subtle changes in the weather over the next few days, so keep up to date with the latest forecasts and any watches/warnings at metservice.com or on mobile devices at m.metservice.com.You can also follow our updates on MetService TV, @metservice on Twitter and at blog.metservice.com.


ends

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