Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Daily capsule for patients with skin cancer

Patients with a rare form of skin cancer could now benefit from first-of-a-kind once daily capsule


Erivedge® (vismodegib), a new medicine that has been shown to help patients with a disfiguring and potentially life-threatening form of skin cancer, is now registered for use in New Zealand.

Erivedge is a first-in-class Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor that helps shrink disfiguring or potentially life-threatening lesions in advanced skin cancer

AUCKLAND – 23 April 2014: From today, adult New Zealanders with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC) or locally advanced BCC (laBCC) where treatment with surgery or radiotherapy is inappropriate, could benefit from Erivedge®. 1 This makes Erivedge, a capsule taken once daily, the only registered medicine for advanced BCC (aBCC, is comprised of mBCC and laBCC) fulfilling an unmet medical need in this group of patients.1

BCC is the most common type of skin cancer in the world. 2 It is estimated that in 2006 there were 43,900 New Zealanders diagnosed with BCC and that this number is growing year on year.

BCC forms the majority (65% - 75%) of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). In 2006, NMSC was estimated to have incurred NZ$51.4 million in healthcare costs (excluding GST) and NZ$6.7 million in lost production.

BCC is considered curable when confined to the skin.

However, in some cases the disease will invade surrounding tissue (locally advanced) or spread to other parts of the body (metastatic BCC) in a manner that cannot be effectively treated with surgery or radiation.
Dr Richard Martin, Cutaneous Surgical Oncologist, says that advanced basal cell carcinoma can be highly disfiguring and can significantly impact quality of life.

“Until now, there have not been any active treatment options available for patients who are not appropriate for surgery or radiotherapy. Erivedge, which has been shown to shrink tumours, addresses this unmet need and is a welcome new treatment option for patients with advanced BCC,” said Dr Martin.

An independent review facility assessment found that Erivedge shrank visible lesions in 43 percent (27/63) of patients with locally advanced BCC inappropriate for surgery or radiotherapy and shrank tumours in 30 percent (10/33) of those with metastatic BCC.

An application for funding will be submitted to PHARMAC in due course. In the interim, Erivedge will be available for private purchase .

-ENDS-

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:


Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news