Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Publications discuss future of families

Publications discuss future of families in the International Year of the Family

Families are the corner stone of society, their futures are critical to us all. Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) is honored to have published two prestigious publications providing perspectives, insights and research to ensure the health and wellbeing of families in future. Contributing to the 20th Anniversary celebrations of the International Year of the Family (IYF) is a major UN landmark publication, Family Futures, and a research report from NPM’s research Te Puāwaitanga o Ngā Whānau: Six Markers of Flourishing Whānau Report.
Families are the corner stone of society, their futures are critical to us all. Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) is honored to have published two prestigious publications providing perspectives, insights and research to ensure the health and wellbeing of families in future. Contributing to the 20th Anniversary celebrations of the International Year of the Family (IYF) is a major UN landmark publication, Family Futures, and a research report from NPM’s research Te Puāwaitanga o Ngā Whānau: Six Markers of Flourishing Whānau Report.

Family Futures is a fully illustrated book with over eighty authors and from forty one organisations relating their efforts in the following areas:

• Confronting family poverty
• Ensuring work-family balance
• Advancing social integration and intergenerational solidarity

Their commentaries draw upon experiences fromaround the world reflecting the importance of strengthening the role of the family in the present and into the future. NPM was invited to participate and its researchers, Sir Mason Durie and Associate Professor Tracey McIntosh both contributed to the volume by drawing on their ongoing work in the area. Principal investigator Sir Mason Durie for NPM, addresses the design and development of Whānau Ora as it “not only included the resolution of a critical event for one or more members of the family, but also building strengths for the whānau as a whole” in his chapter entitled Whānau Ora: strengthening Māori families in Aotearoa, New Zealand.

NPM Director Tracey McIntosh and co-chair of the Expert Advisory Group on Solutions to Child Poverty contributes with her piece on Māori whānau well-being: addressing child and family poverty.

She notes that “whānau poverty is a serious challenge but it is not beyond our capabilities. Poverty is not a natural condition, it is a social condition. With consciousness, appropriate resourcing and will, including political will, we can make positive social change that will enable Māori whānau and other families to flourish in New Zealand.”

Family Futures amplifies and contributes to the international dialogue created by the 20th Anniversary of the International Year of the Family in 2014.
To view the digital version of Family Future please visit NPM’s website http://www.maramatanga.ac.nz/publication/family-futures

The second publication, Te Puāwaitanga o Ngā Whānau: Six Markers of Flourishing Whānau Report, created from a research collaboration between Te Wānanga o Raukawa, Massey University and NPM, was launched in March. The research projects team is led by Sir Mason Durie and involves Associate Professor Te Kani Kingi, Professor Chris Cunningham, Professor Cindy Kiro, Dr Lis Ellison-Loschmann and Associate Professor Barry Borman and Dr Meihana Durie.

This report defines and identifies the features of ‘flourishing’ and the relevance of flourishing to whānau. It has set out to explore the concept of flourishing whānau and the types of factors which promote whānau growth and development and the implications of this in national and global settings.

Associate Professor Te Kani Kingi says “the report, while exploring flourishing whānau and whānau development, places emphasis on the identification of cultural variables and those which are especially important to Māori whānau.”

“NPM see whānau and family as the cornerstone of a healthy and functioning society, economy and culture. For historical and contemporary reasons, barriers to the health and wellbeing of Māori people have inhibited their full potential to participate and create new opportunities for themselves and their communities. We are pleased to contribute these publications to development of families’ prosperity and wellbeing” says Tracey McIntosh, Director, NPM.

To view and download Te Puāwaitanga o Ngā Whānau: Six Markers of Flourishing Whānau Report please visit NPM’s website at http://www.maramatanga.ac.nz/project/fostering-te-pā-harakeke-advancing-healthy-and-prosperous-families-mana

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) is a Centre of Research Excellence consisting of 16 participating research entities and hosted by the University of Auckland. NPM conducts research of relevance to Māori communities and is an important vehicle by which New Zealand continues to be a key player in global indigenous research and affairs. Its research is underpinned by the vision to realise the creative potential of Māori communities and to bring about positive change and transformation in the nation and wider world. Visitwww.maramatanga.ac.nz
Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news