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New Zealand International Science Festival

New Zealand International Science Festival, 5 to 13 July, Dunedin, New Zealand

‘Leave boring behind’ this winter, with tickets and booking details to all events in the ninth New Zealand International Science Festival available from Monday 9 June. The festival will take place at various venues in Dunedin over nine days from5 July to 13 July 2014.

The complete programme of festival events, with full booking details, is now available online at www.scifest.org.nz

The festival has attracted an impressive line-up of international science stars from around the globe. This year they include zany Edinburgh-based stunt scientist Tom Pringle, aka Dr Bunhead, bringing audiences face-to-face with “the silly, crazy, dirty, dangerous and magnificent side of science”; Kiwi expat Ryan Johnson, marine explorer, white shark scientist and documentary filmmaker; UK science communicator James Piercy, who will share the story of his recovery following a serious brain injury; Professor Terrence Collins, billed as the world’s first “green” chemistry lecturer, who will share his insights into improving sustainability; and Australian science show performer Dr Graham Walker, who is bound to astonish audiences with his mind-bending, world-class science shows.

Festival director Chris Green says festival events will book out quickly and urges the public to book early so they don’t miss out!

“This year we anticipate that the live science shows, the science of whiskey and beer evenings, children’s workshops and presentations by our international guests will be extremely popular. Events will take place in the city from Mosgiel to Port Chalmers, with a series of free interactive science shows taking place in the festival hub (the Wall Street Mall) and kids’ workshops happening in Workshop Central (Dunedin Public Library).”

During the festival, kids and teens will be tempted to experience the amazing world of science at workshops held in a number of locations around the city. A big ‘science of sport’ night is planned, and a unique combination of karate and physics will be featured in a series dubbed ‘fight like a physicist’. Other sessions will explore the anatomy of a crime scene; robotics; how to ‘wriggle and squirm with worms’; how the heart works; and the power of poo! The popular chemistry show ‘BANG’ is back with exciting extras including a magician, and a Big Night in Family Quiz, with Australian science show performer Dr Graham Walker, is aimed at getting the family together for a whole heap of fun.
For this ninth science festival there are over 120 events planned, with 90% free to the public. Events include the popular University of Otago’s Science Expo, on Saturday 5 July and Sunday 6 July, inspiring the next generation of young scientists with a stimulating range of hands-on activities designed to beat the winter blues. A ‘women in science’ breakfast is planned and other events will include a ‘dining in the dark’ evening, free health checks and panel discussions.

In addition to the high-profile international visitors, the festival involves many local organisations, volunteers, institutions, external event organisers, and a range of local and national sponsors and funders including two major funding partners, the University of Otago and the Dunedin City Council.

Ticket and booking details for all festival events are now available from 9 June including a full programme of events on www.scifest..org.nz .

ENDS

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