Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Researcher seeking to dissolve the cost of secondary surgery

Canterbury researcher seeking to dissolve the cost of secondary surgery

June 8, 2014

A University of Canterbury researcher is investigating the potential benefits of using degradable metallic alloy plates and screws for patients with serious head injuries.

Mechanical engineering’s Dr Mark Staiger believes that in the not-so-distant future magnesium metal plates or screws that break down safely within the body will be useful in treating bone fractures.

The costs of treating people with severe head or facial injuries are high while the current solutions are not ideal, Dr Staiger says. Degradable plates or screws would substantially improve surgical management of head or facial fractures and would lower patient management costs.

``During its lifetime, an implant that is intended to temporarily assist the healing of a bone will transition from an implant to a foreign body, once the body has healed itself. A major driver of this research is the cost-effective removal of this foreign body by having it biodegrade after having completed its role in bone healing,’’ Dr Staiger says.

``Along with collaborators from Otago University, we are developing degradable magnesium plates and screws that will improve hospital costs and patient outcomes, representing a paradigm shift in the current technology. This new approach will deliver reduced patient recovery time by enhancing new bone formation and reduce cost by eliminating the need for secondary surgery to remove implants.

``Based on the number of plates used annually at Dunedin hospital and the cost of maxillofacial surgery, plate removal alone is estimated to cost the New Zealand health system $12 million a year alone, while world-wide the total costs are staggering.

``This research will attempt to eliminate current problems with permanent devices including growth restriction, bone resorption due to stress shielding and infection. Titanium implants are the current gold standard to obtain rigid fixation in damaged bone, partially based on the belief that titanium resists corrosion in the body.

``Rigid titanium-based plates or screws have gained widespread acceptance in correcting head deformities and in the management of fractures in the last two decades. However, 50 percent of all titanium plate systems require removal. A temporary biodegradable implant would eliminate the need for surgical removal of the implant. Our previous work on the breaking down of magnesium alloys has shown their potential as a new degradable implant material.

``We are looking to establish close partnerships with device manufacturers that will support the longer term development of degradable devices with the aim of creating new opportunities for the New Zealand biomedical industry,” Dr Staiger says.


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Cosmetics & Pollution: Proposal To Ban Microbeads

Cosmetic products containing microbeads will be banned under a proposal announced by the Minister for the Environment today. Marine scientists have been advocating for a ban on the microplastics, which have been found to quickly enter waterways and harm marine life. More>>

ALSO:

NIWA: 2016 New Zealand’s Warmest Year On Record

Annual temperatures were above average (0.51°C to 1.20°C above the annual average) throughout the country, with very few locations observing near average temperatures (within 0.5°C of the annual average) or lower. The year 2016 was the warmest on record for New Zealand, based on NIWA’s seven-station series which begins in 1909. More>>

ALSO:

Farewell 2016: NZ Economy Flies Through 2016's Political Curveballs

Dec. 23 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy batted away some curly political curveballs of 2016 to end the year on a high note, with its twin planks of a booming construction sector and rampant tourism soon to be joined by a resurgent dairy industry. More>>

ALSO:


NZ Economy: More Growth Than Expected In 3rd Qtr

Dec. 22 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy grew at a faster pace than expected in the September quarter as a booming construction sector continued to underpin activity, spilling over into related building services, and was bolstered by tourism and transport ... More>>

  • NZ Govt - Solid growth for NZ despite fragile world economy
  • NZ Council of Trade Unions - Government needs to ensure economy raises living standards
  • KiwiRail Goes Deisel: Cans electric trains on partially electrified North Island trunkline

    Dec. 21 (BusinessDesk) – KiwiRail, the state-owned rail and freight operator, said a small fleet of electric trains on New Zealand’s North Island would be phased out over the next two years and replaced with diesel locomotives. More>>

  • KiwiRail - KiwiRail announces fleet decision on North Island line
  • Greens - Ditching electric trains massive step backwards
  • Labour - Bill English turns ‘Think Big’ into ‘Think Backwards’
  • First Union - Train drivers condemn KiwiRail’s return to “dirty diesel”
  • NZ First - KiwiRail Going Backwards for Xmas
  • NIWA: The Year's Top Science Findings

    Since 1972 NIWA has operated a Clean Air Monitoring Station at Baring Head, near Wellington... In June, Baring Head’s carbon dioxide readings officially passed 400 parts per million (ppm), a level last reached more than three million years ago. More>>

    ALSO:

    Get More From Scoop

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Sci-Tech
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news