Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


New Zealand taking the lead with 3D scanner

Canterbury and New Zealand taking the lead with 3D scanner to help reduce diseases

June 22, 2014

The University of Canterbury and New Zealand is leading the world’s pre-clinical imaging market with research work on its commercial 3D scanner improving the treatment of diseases.

The university’s spin-out company‘s MARS-Bioimaging scanner can look inside the body to examine molecular structures, tissues, diagnose common illnesses such as the build-up of plaque in heart disease and also cartilage and arthritis. It also enables drug delivery systems that allow researchers to follow drugs in the body to help the fight against cancer and joint diseases.

Associate Professor Anthony Butler says it is important for New Zealand to have a world-leading biomedical research tools so health researchers can understand new information.

``We have been the first in the world to explore the scanner and its applications. While others theorise about scanner uses we can actually test them.

``Five years ago there were only a small number of people in the world doing this research. There are now special editions of journals covering the topics and conferences. The preclinical imaging market involving scanners used in medical research is worth about $US200 million a year and growing 16 percent annually.’’

MARS-Bioimaging last year won the Canterbury Regional Deloitte Fast 50 Rising Star Award. The University of Canterbury, which has a share in the company, has a Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment bid under consideration with a goal is to build a scanner to use on patients.

``If we have success with the bid we expect to be safely scanning large animals such as sheep in about three years and able to undertake human clinical trials in five years’ time. The scanner will be hosted in Otago University’s Christchurch Medical School. Several local companies MBI, Interlink Research and Shamrock are partners. International partners include CERN, GE Healthcare and Kromek.

``We face a number of technical challenges such as the quality of sensor materials and coping with the high power of the x-ray tubes used for human scanning.

``On the clinical side we know there is likely to be benefit for monitoring drug delivery agents and joint implant imaging. The purpose of a human scanner for clinical trials is to evaluate how this new information translates to improved human diagnosis and management.

``The University of Canterbury has $4.5 million of Government funding from 2008 to 2014 to work on the project, has spent significant time and money building scanners. MARS-Bioimaging is selling the technology -components and scanners – internationally,’’ Associate Professor Prof Butler says.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Half Empty: Fonterra's 2017 Opening Forecast Below Expectations

Fonterra Cooperative Group raised its forecast farmgate milk payout for next season by less than expected as the world's largest dairy exporter predicts lower prices will crimp production and supply will pick up. The New Zealand dollar fell. More>>

ALSO:

Pest Control: Mouse Blitz Team Leaves For Antipodes

The Million Dollar Mouse project to rid Antipodes Island of mice is underway with the departure of a rodent eradication team to the remote nature reserve and World Heritage Area. More>>

Gongs Got: Canon Media Awards & NZ Radio Awards Happen

Radio NZ: RNZ website The Wireless, which is co-funded by NZ On Air, was named best website, while Toby Manhire and Toby Morris won the best opinion general writing section for their weekly column on rnz.co.nz and Tess McClure won the best junior feature writer section. More>>

ALSO:

Pre-Budget: Debt Focus Risks Losing Opportunity To Stoke Economy

The Treasury is likely to upgrade its forecasts for economic growth in Budget 2016 next week but Finance Minister Bill English has already signalled that more of his focus is on debt repayment than on fiscal stimulus or tax cuts... More>>

ALSO:

Fulton Hogan's Heroes: Managing Director Nick Miller Resigns

Fulton Hogan managing director Nick Miller will leave the privately owned construction company after seven years in charge. The Dunedin-based company has kicked off a search for a replacement, and Miller will stay on at the helm until March next year, or until a successor has been appointed and a transition period completed. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Electricity, Executions, And Bob Dylan

The Electricity Authority has unveiled the final version of its pricing plan for electricity transmission. This will change the way transmission prices (which comprise about 10% of the average power bill) are computed, and will add hundreds of dollars a year to power bills for many ordinary consumers. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Fonterra NZ, Australia Milk Collection Drops In Season

Fonterra Cooperative Group says milk collection is down in New Zealand and Australia, its two largest markets, in the first 11 months of the season during a period of weak dairy prices. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news