Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

NMIT Salmon Rearing Project in Schools

NMIT Salmon Rearing Project in Schools

There’s something fishy about a lot of schools in the Top of the South.

Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology (NMIT)’s innovative Salmon Rearing Project which has been running for the past three years will see three primary/intermediate schools and six secondary schools throughout Nelson, Tasman and Marlborough supplied with tanks, filtration systems, water coolers and water quality testing kits this year.

Each year around May/June, the participating schools are given 50 salmon eggs which they are responsible for hatching and rearing until October/November when the salmon are released into the Waimea River Park Fishing ponds. Students from NMIT’s Diploma in Aquaculture programme act as mentors to the schools and oversee the fish rearing.

Dr Mark Burdass, NMIT’s Aquaculture Programme Coordinator says the project provides a real-world learning opportunity for students studying aquaculture.

“Being responsible for overseeing a group of people who generally haven’t had much experience managing fish provides a great way for our students to develop their problem-solving abilities and communication skills. They are able to apply what they learn from working on this project to any other marine fish-rearing process.”

Schools integrate the project into their teaching curriculum in many different ways – some use it in biology classes, others for teaching environmental studies or mathematics. NMIT does not dictate how the fish can be used but supplies a wide range of teaching and learning materials offering different ideas.

The project is also helping to raise the profile of the Aquaculture industry as a possible career path for students. This year, four students who were involved with the salmon rearing project in schools have gone onto enrol on the Diploma in Aquaculture.

NMIT offers the country’s only Diploma in Aquaculture which was launched in 2011 to meet the needs of the country’s burgeoning aquaculture sector - 70 percent of which is based in the Nelson, Tasman and Marlborough region. More than 2,500 people are employed in the sector across the Top of the South.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

By May 2018: Wider, Earlier Microbead Ban

The sale and manufacture of wash-off products containing plastic microbeads will be banned in New Zealand earlier than previously expected, Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Snail-ier Mail: NZ Post To Ditch FastPost

New Zealand Post customers will see a change to how they can send priority mail from 1 January 2018. The FastPost service will no longer be available from this date. More>>

ALSO:

Property Institute: English Backs Of Debt To Income Plan

Property Institute of New Zealand Chief Executive Ashley Church is applauding today’s decision, by Prime Minister Bill English, to take Debt-to-income ratios off the table as a tool available to the Reserve Bank. More>>

ALSO:

Divesting: NZ Super Fund Shifts Passive Equities To Low-Carbon

The NZ$35 billion NZ Super Fund’s NZ$14 billion global passive equity portfolio, 40% of the overall Fund, is now low-carbon, the Guardians of New Zealand Superannuation announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Split Decision - Appeal Planned: EPA Allows Taranaki Bight Seabed Mine

The Decision-making Committee, appointed by the Board of the Environmental Protection Authority to decide a marine consent application by Trans-Tasman Resources Ltd, has granted consent, subject to conditions, for the company to mine iron sands off the South Taranaki Bight. More>>

ALSO: