Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Fish experience heart failure as water temperature rises

Fish experience heart failure as water temperature rises

Fish may experience heart failure as ocean temperatures rise due to climate change, according to new research from the University of Auckland.

School of Biological Sciences researchers Anthony Hickey and Fathima Iftikar say the effect of climate change on animals is clear, particularly ectotherms, or cold-bodied animals, such as most fish which rely on their surroundings to maintain optimum body temperature.

“This research shows that the heart acts as a ‘bio-indicator’ of which species may survive rises in ocean temperature but exactly why heart failure occurs we still don’t know,” Dr Hickey says.

The new study, funded through the Marsden Fund and involving Canadian and Australian researchers, found that mitochondria – the power units within heart cells – begin to fail as temperatures rise.

Dr Hickey and Dr Iftikar exposed three species of wrasse from different environments – tropical, temperate and cold – to gradually rising water temperatures. The Australian tropical species Thalassoma lunare (commonly known as moon wrasse) fared worst. These fish inhabit the narrowest thermal range of any species in the study.

“The tropical wrasse could only tolerate a shift of a few degrees before experiencing changes to their mitochondria, and this resulted in a loss of efficiency so that even though the fish could acclimatise to some degree, it came at a cost,” Dr Hickey says.

The life-sustaining mitochondria began to fail in all three species before full heart failure occurred, suggesting mitochondrial failure likely accounts for heart failure in heat-stressed animals.

The study suggests that the impact of changes in temperature have an impact on fish mitochondria, limiting the range of environments the fish can occupy. This has important implications if sea temperature rises predicted by climate scientists are accurate, Dr Hickey says.

“Understanding mitochondrial function, or dysfunction, in ectotherms such as fish has important ramifications in terms of climate change and requires more study to investigate the capacity of a wide range of species to survive ocean warming.”

Similar responses have been seen in commercially-important crab species, and in heat stressed mammalian mitochondria.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

OceanaGold: Man Killed In Waihi Mine Accident

A 29-year-old man had died following a work place accident at OceanaGold mine, Waihi last night. The man was killed after the front end loader he was in rolled down a slope. The accident happened at approximately 6.30pm on Thursday night. More>>

ALSO:

Constructing Consent: Annual Housing Consents Highest In Over A Decade

More than 29,000 new homes gained building consent in the year to June 2016, up 16 percent from the previous June year, Statistics New Zealand said today. More>>

ALSO:

War Against Weevil For Future Peas: “No Peas, No Weevil” Ban Now In Place In Wairarapa

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has today placed a ban on growing peas within a specified area and placed controls on moving pea material (seed and untreated pea straw) within, in and out of this area for the next 2 years. More>>

ALSO:

Wood Producers: Crisis In New Zealand Log Supply

New Zealand wood processing leaders held a hui with senior government officials and political leaders in Whangarei yesterday to assess the acute log supply shortage to local mills in Northland. More>>

Consents And Taxes: Trustpower 'Very Disappointed' With Judgement

Trustpower is "very disappointed" with a Supreme Court ruling dismissing its bid to claim tax deductions on $17.7 million of project costs in a case closely watched by large-scale infrastructure developers. More>>

ALSO:

Fruitful Endeavours: Kiwifruit Exports Reach Record Levels

In June 2016, kiwifruit exports rose $105 million (47 percent) from June 2015 to reach $331 million, Statistics New Zealand said today. Overall, goods exports rose $109 million (2.6 percent) in June 2016 (to $4.3 billion). More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news