Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Wellington welcomes women in science

Wellington welcomes women in science


Around 150 women in science will be gathering in Wellington this week to share war stories and inspiration, including fourteen school students from across the country.


The eighth triennial Association for Women in the Sciences brings together women and girls from across the New Zealand sciences to share ideas and learn from each other.


“The networks built at AWIS conferences are incredibly important, whether for a short time or a lifetime,” says Esther Haines, AWIS National Convenor. “Whilst most women attending the conference have very different scientific backgrounds, many have similar issues during their career, such as choices around family or working in a male-dominated environment, particularly at higher levels of the science system. AWIS’ activities, and most especially the conference, give women a chance to learn from each other and share thoughts, problems and successes in a positive environment.”


Highlights from the 2014 conference include presentations of scientific research related to specific issues facing women in science, such as how research rankings may be biased towards men, and the differences between male and female behaviour and thinking. Sessions will also include career case studies from some of New Zealand’s foremost women in science – including Massey University’s Professor Brigid Heywood, Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research) and Professor Susanne Rasmussen, Professor in Grasslands Technology.


On the second day of the conference, a panel of three political women - Hon Jo Goodhew, Minister of Women’s Affairs; Moana Mackey, Labour Party’s spokesperson for the Environment and Climate Change; and Eugenie Sage, Green Party spokesperson for conservation, environment, conservation, local government and Christchurch – will discuss the policy and personal decisions for women in science.


The official presentation of the inaugural Dame Miriam Dell Award for Excellence in Science Mentoring will also take place during the conference, to Dr Judith O’Brien from the University of Auckland. The award is named for the AWIS Patron, who celebrated her 90th birthday earlier this year.


This year, a group of fourteen secondary school students will be taking part in the conference, thanks to sponsorship from the Faculty of Engineering at Waikato University and the MacDiarmid Institute. These students will be hosted by a group of students from and sponsored by the School of Chemical & Physical Sciences at Victoria University Wellington.


Other sponsors of the conference include conference sponsors the faculty of Science at VUW and the Cawthron Institute, as well as the Allan Wilson Centre, Catalyst IT, NIWA, Division of Science at Unviersity of Otago, Royal Society of New Zealand, MetService, Plant & Food Research and WelTec.


More information about the conference, including the programme, is available at http://www.awis.org.nz/conference2014. For those who wish to attend but are not yet registered, registration is available from the Registration Desk.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news