Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Leading Antarctic researcher wins global award

Leading Antarctic researcher wins global award

Professor Tim Naish, Director of Victoria University of Wellington’s Antarctic Research Centre, has received a prestigious international award for his outstanding research into understanding Antarctica’s response to past and present climate change and the role of Antarctica’s ice sheets in global sea-level change through time.

Professor Naish, who is also a Principal Scientist at GNS Science, has become the first New Zealand recipient of the Martha T. Muse Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica. This leading global award for Antarctic science is funded by the Tinker Foundation and administered by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). The award recognises significant and sustained contribution to Antarctic scientific research and policy.

Professor Naish receives US$100,000 in prize money with the award which will be presented in Auckland next month when New Zealand hosts the biennial SCAR Open Science Conference.

He says he is thrilled and honoured to receive the 2014 Muse Prize which reflects the combined efforts of a much larger group.

“That includes my friends and colleagues at the Antarctic Research Centre at Victoria University and at GNS Science as well as a fantastic network of national and international collaborators.

“The nature of Antarctic research is multidisciplinary, expensive and logistically complex and can only really be achieved through multinational collaboration and the pooling of resources. I have been privileged to work with some of the world’s best scientists on some very important questions about how Antarctica’s ice sheets respond to climate change and contribute to rising global sea-levels,” he says.

“The policy relevance of Antarctica is hard to ignore, given that the contribution of its ice sheets to future sea-level rise is still one of the biggest uncertainties facing humanity,” says Professor Naish.

“While there is still a lot more work to do, over the last 10 years the international research community has made major progress in understanding how the highly vulnerable marine-based parts of the Antarctic ice sheet respond to climate change and particularly to a warming Southern Ocean.

“It is a privilege to have contributed in some small way to this effort.”

Victoria University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Science Professor Mike Wilson, congratulated Professor Naish on his award which he described as an outstanding achievement.

“The award is also recognition of New Zealand’s world-class Antarctic research programme, and, specifically, Victoria University’s Antarctic Research Centre which has gained an international reputation in understanding Antarctica’s past climate to better predict further changes,” says Professor Wilson.

Antarctica New Zealand Chief Executive Peter Beggs, said the recognition of Professor Naish as a global research leader was a major boost for New Zealand’s Antarctic endeavours.

“New Zealand is acknowledged as a leading collaborator in Antarctic science and policy and it is a significant achievement for an individual scientist to be recognised by his scientific peers with such a prestigious award,” he says.

The presentation of the Martha T. Muse prize will be a highlight of the SCAR Open Science Conference which will be attended by close to 1000 of the world’s leading Antarctic science and policy experts in Auckland from August 25 - 28.

To find out more about the Martha T. Muse Prize, visit http://www.museprize.org/index.html

To find out more about the Tinker Foundation visit www.tinker.org

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Housing Policy: Auckland Densification As Popular As Ebola, English Says

Finance Minister Bill English said calls by the Reserve Bank Governor for more densification in Auckland’s housing were “about as popular in parts of Auckland as Ebola” would be. More>>

ALSO:

Crown Accounts: NZ Government Deficit Smaller Than Expected In First Half

The New Zealand government's operating deficit was smaller than expected in the first six months of the financial year, as the consumption and corporate tax take rose ahead of forecast in December, having lagged estimates in previous months. More>>

ALSO:

Fruit & Veg Crackdown: Auckland Fruit Fly Find Under Investigation

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is investigating a find of a single male Queensland fruit fly in a surveillance trap in the Auckland suburb of Grey Lynn... MPI has placed legal controls on the movement of fruit and some vegetables outside of a defined circular area which extends 1.5km from where the fly was trapped in Grey Lynn. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Westpac NZ Reaches $2.97M Swaps Settlement

Westpac Banking Corp’s New Zealand unit has agreed to pay $2.97 million in a settlement with the Commerce Commission over the way the bank sold interest rate swaps to farmers between 2005 and 2012. More>>

ALSO:

Going Dutch: Fonterra Kicks Off $144M Partnership With Dutch Cheese Maker

Fonterra Co-operative Group, the world’s largest dairy exporter, has commissioned a new dairy ingredients plant in Heerenveen, in the north of the Netherlands, its first wholly-owned and operated ingredients plant in Europe. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: NZ Retail Sales Beat Estimates

New Zealand retail sales rose more than expected in the fourth quarter, led by vehicle-related transactions, food and beverages, adding to evidence that cheap credit and a growing jobs market are encouraging consumers to spend. More>>

ALSO:

Delivery Cuts Go Ahead: 'Government Money Grab' From NZ Post

"It's a money grab by the Government as the shareholder of New Zealand Post" says Postal Workers Union advocate Graeme Clarke about the changes announced by NZ Post. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news