Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

Quakes impact on substance use and mental health quantified

Quakes impact on substance use and mental health quantified.

Cantabrians who experienced serious quake-related adversity are twice as likely to be addicted to smoking and 40 per cent more likely to have mental health conditions such as major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder than people who did not experience the earthquakes, new research shows.

However for Cantabrians who experienced minimal trauma, loss or ongoing disruption associated with the quakes, the psychological impact was less strong.

This information is contained in a paper by University of Otago, Christchurch, researchers, published in the latest edition of the prestigious JAMA Psychiatry Journal.

The researchers are in a unique position to gather facts on the psychological impact of quakes. For more than 30 years Professor David Fergusson and his Christchurch Health and Development Study colleagues have collected in-depth data on the mental health of a group of more than 1000 people born in Canterbury during 1977. By chance, just over half of study participants were in Canterbury for the majority of the earthquakes.

The team found:

• Cantabrians who experienced serious adversity, both through earthquake events and following consequences, were 40 per cent more likely than those living outside the region to have at least one of several kinds of disorder including: major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety disorder.

• Rates of clinically significant nicotine dependence were 1.9 times higher in the group of people most affected by earthquakes compared to those not affected by quakes.

• Rates of drinking and illicit drug taking did not increase significantly in those adversely affected by earthquakes.

Professor Fergusson says: “These findings are likely to apply to other areas affected by major disasters and highlight the need to provide increased support to those most severely affected by these disasters. It is also clear, however, that the majority of those facing disasters are resilient and do not develop mental health problems.”

Professor Fergusson says it appears the psychological impact of the quakes could have been worse if community spirit were not so strong.

“A key consideration (in studying the impact of Canterbury quakes) is the well-organised and responsive way in which the Canterbury community responded to these disasters with widespread support for those families affected by the disasters. This is likely to have acted as a protective factor in mitigating the consequence for those with high levels of exposure to earthquake-related adversity.’’

The findings of Professor Fergusson’s study relate to those aged in their early 3os (study participants) and are less informative for older or younger people.

The study was funded by the Health Research Council, Cure Kids, the Canterbury Medical Research Foundation and the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

'Irregular Accounting': Voluntary Suspension Of Fuji Xerox Govt Contracting

This suspension gives the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment time to understand the full implications of the report from FUJIFILM Holdings into irregular accounting practices at FXNZ. More>>

ALSO:

MPI: Cow Disease Detected In NZ For First Time

MPI is responding to the detection of the cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis in a dairy herd in South Canterbury... The disease is commonly found in cattle globally, including in Australia, but it’s the first detection of it in New Zealand. More>>

South Island Flooding: Focus Moves To Recovery

As water recedes throughout flood-impacted areas of the South Island, Minister of Civil Defence Nathan Guy has praised the efforts of those who were involved in the response to the flooding... More>>

ALSO:

Superu Report: Land Regulation Drives Auckland House Prices

Land use regulation is responsible for up to 56 per cent of the cost of an average house in Auckland according to a new research report quantifying the impact of land use regulations, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Fund For PPP Plans: Govt Embraces Targeted Rates To Spur Urban Infrastructure

The government's latest response to the Auckland housing shortage will see central government and private sector firms invest in 'special purpose vehicles' to fund essential roading, water and drains that Auckland Council can't fund without threatening its credit rating. More>>

ALSO: