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CPIT Research month shares the knowledge

CPIT Research month shares the knowledge


Students pitch a project, staff present research with practical applications and a panel of lively debaters decide whether ‘science is more creative than art’ at CPIT’s Research Month from 4 to 28 August.

The lunchtime presentations commence with guest speaker Mike Gillooly from the Christchurch City Council discussing Resilience and Research (Flooding in post-earthquake Christchurch) on 5 August at 12.25pm.

The programme then journeys through topics covering business, language, visual arts, sustainability, science, music, teaching and learning, sports science and the caring professions.

CPIT staff have been encouraged to disseminate the findings of their research, which is geared towards practical applications in a variety of sectors. From a cancer zapping technology to a culturally appropriate new way for non-Maori to introduce themselves in mihi, there are so many interesting topics to explore.

Students join in the action, pitching a project for the chance to win up to $300 towards their research project on 6, 7 and 8 August.

Meanwhile Research Month introduces the Great Debate, pitting creative and applied science tutors against each other to find out whether science is more creative than art on 27 August at 12.50 - 1.30pm. Engineering and science tutors Michael Edmonds, Miranda Satherwaite and Jerry Shearman will argue ‘for’, while creative tutors Dorothee Pauli, Bruce Russell and Henry Sunderland argue ‘against’.

All Research Month presentations are in L233 at the Madras Street campus. See http://www.cpit.ac.nz/news-and-events/upcoming-events/events/research-month3 for programme details.


ends

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