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Knowledge exchange on ageing research

Knowledge exchange on ageing research

University of Auckland
11h August 2014


Knowledge exchange on ageing research

Research into ageing is the focus of a forum or knowledge exchange to be held at the Tamaki Innovation Campus later this month.

The free workshop is open to anyone interested in ageing research and gerontology, and is supported by funding from the Selwyn Foundation and the Hope Foundation. The Consortium for Health in Ageing, a collaborative group of researchers from across the University of Auckland, is facilitating the meeting.

University of Auckland researchers will take a leading role among speakers sharing their research journey, presenting their own research and contributing to an ideas forum, looking at the gaps in ageing research in New Zealand.

“It’s a gathering of researchers interested in improving the care of older people, showcasing recent research and talking about how we can develop this research,” says the Head of the University’s School of Population Health, Professor Ngaire Kerse, who is an internationally acknowledged expert on research into ageing.

Professor Kerse has recently returned from a year-long sabbatical where she collaborated with other researchers into ageing, and compared longitudinal studies into ageing (in Newcastle, the Netherlands and Japan) with the University’s own LILACS NZ study.

LILACS NZ is a longitudinal study that was started in 2010 to determine the predictors of successful advanced ageing and to understand the trajectories of health and wellbeing in advanced age.

The research aims to help people to plan better for their own health and wellbeing in later life, to allow elderly New Zealanders to share their wisdom with future generations, and to inform the development of local and national policies to benefit older people.

“This study is unique in that it involves a significant number of indigenous people. The sample comprises both Māori (400) and non- Māori (500) and the study team includes both Māori and non-Māori investigators (based at the University of Auckland, University of Otago, Massey University and AUT), as well as community partners in the Bay of Plenty region,” says Professor Kerse.

After she spent six months collaborating on the Newcastle study, she travelled to Leiden in the Netherlands to work with the researchers on their study.

During her stay in Leiden some of the researchers from each of the four longitudinal studies formed the TULIP (Towards Understanding Longitudinal Investigations of older People) Consortium, as an international network for exchanging outcomes of the four studies.

The Knowledge Exchange for Research on Ageing is to be held on Friday 28 and Saturday 29 August at the Tamaki Innovation Campus (261 Morrins Rd, St Johns) It is open to students, fellows and researchers, but registration is essential for catering purposes. Email mtodd@xtra.co.nz or rpaddy@ihug.co.nz

ENDS

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