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Turbulent northwesterlies then cold southwesterlies

Turbulent northwesterlies then cold southwesterlies

"It's an unsettled start to the week for many as a broad trough of low pressure with multiple embedded fronts, advances over the country from the south," commented MetService meteorologist Liz Walsh. Heavy rain in Fiordland and the ranges of Westland is expected to ease later today, as the first of a series of fronts moves onto the North Island bringing a burst of rain for most areas from later this afternoon and into the overnight period.

Rain eases to showers in the west of the North Island tomorrow. Meanwhile,over the South Island, sleety showers and cold southerlies sweep north, with snow lowering to low levels once again in the far south.

"We commence the week with windy, wet, but relatively mild conditions,followed swiftly by a biting south to southwest airstream, which is expected to persist throughout this week," added Walsh.

Snow showers are likely to low levels over southern New Zealand at times,as well as some of the higher roads in the North Island as the week progresses. Places like Southland and Clutha are likely to see most of the snow showers however, accumulations are unlikely to be as impressive as last week. Roads in those southern areas may be affected by snow, while further north, icy conditions at times could make driving treacherous.Stronger winds may occur along the eastern shores of both islands on Thursday and Friday.

"I think what a lot of people will notice this week is the wind chill factor. Those bone-chilling southwesterlies make a return from tomorrow, opening the door to a showery flow, occasionally laced with hail, but some sunny spells are likely to feature too," Walsh continued.

The chilly air will likely see frosts forming in both Islands during the nights, with some severe frosts in the Canterbury and Otago areas, where maximums may struggle to get out of single digits later in the week.

ends

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