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NZ science: early warning for global trends

NZ science: early warning for global trends


Science advisor explains why more than 2000 science leaders will converge on Auckland next week.


The Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor Sir Peter Gluckman will speak at a free public event Science – New Zealand’s place in the world at 7.30pm on Monday 25 August at the University of Auckland, setting the scene for two weeks that will place NZ firmly at the global hub of science.


Sir Peter says that despite the relatively small size of our population and economy, New Zealand is increasingly seen as an important part of the international science system. Between 24 August and 03 September, Auckland will host a series of international science summits from The Open Science Conference of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) through to the General Assembly of the International Council for Science (ICSU). Sir Peter is himself hosting and chairing the first ever meeting of the world’s leading government and multinational science advisors and a number of related events.


In Science – New Zealand’s place in the world Sir Peter will give an overview of why all these events are happening in New Zealand and what that means for the country from economic, social, environmental, reputational and diplomatic perspectives.


Science now plays an important role in international diplomacy, says Sir Peter, describing New Zealand as “the canary in the mine of international science”.


“Small, developed nations with relatively simple science systems such as ours provide an early warning for global issues.


“Beyond our world-ranked scientists and discoveries we are leading the way in drawing attention to the place of science in government and trans-national decision-making, trade and diplomacy and driving initiatives to improve the health of our planet.”


As a stellar example of such initiatives, Sir Peter will introduce fellow speaker Dr Harry Clark, Director of New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre. Unlike other notable multinational science collaborations which centre on highly specialised equipment, this New Zealand led research programme is harnessing the intellectual power of our science and scientists in an effort to reduce the 20% of world’s greenhouse gasses that come from agriculture and food production.


Event details


Science – New Zealand’s Place in the World


When: Monday 25 August 2014, 7.30pm
Where: University of Auckland Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences
85 Park Road, Grafton


No charge, book at www.royalsociety.org.nz/events/world-science-week-new-zealand/science-new-zealands-place-world/


ends

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