Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Talk to explore fate of Antarctic ice sheet

Talk to explore fate of Antarctic ice sheet


The Antarctic ice sheet’s contribution to future sea-level rise will be explored by a world-leading polar scientist who is giving the 2014 S.T. Lee Lecture.

Robert DeConto, Professor of Geosciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, United States, will give the 12th annual lecture in Wellington on Wednesday 3 September.

Rob DeContoProfessor DeConto will discuss what geological records tell us about the past history of the ice sheet and how they inform predictive models for coming decades and centuries.

Professor DeConto’s background spans geophysics, oceanography and atmospheric science. He has held research positions at both the United States National Center for Atmospheric Research and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

In the last decade, his focus has shifted toward the polar regions, including the development of numerical climate and ice sheet models, and the application of those models to a wide range of past and future climate scenarios.

Professor DeConto’s new model output, which he will present in the lecture, shows seas will rise one metre by the year 2100 and 10 metres by 2500 due to the Antarctic ice sheet. His work suggests that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) sea-level rise projections are underestimating the Antarctic ice sheet contribution.

“What is concerning is that the Antarctic ice sheet appears to be much more sensitive to climate change than we previously thought,” says Professor DeConto.

Professor Tim Naish, Director of Victoria’s Antarctic Research Centre, says Professor DeConto’s science is highly relevant to a nation such as New Zealand which has so much of its infrastructure and population near the coastline.

The S.T. Lee Lecture is organised by the Antarctic Research Centre in conjunction with the Victoria University Foundation, and delivered by internationally-renowned guest speakers who share their expertise with staff, students and others interested in Antarctic research.

Event details:
Annual S.T. Lee Lecture in Antarctic Studies presented by Professor Robert DeConto
The fate of the Antarctic ice sheet: Lessons from the geological past and how they are informing future predictions
Wednesday 3 September 2014, 5–6pm
Hunter Council Chambers, Victoria University, Kelburn Campus

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Final Frontier: Rocket Lab And NASA Sign Commercial Space Launch Agreement

Rocket Lab has signed a Commercial Space Launch Act Agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The agreement enables Rocket Lab to use NASA resources - including personnel, facilities and equipment - for launch and reentry efforts. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Wheeler Downplays Scope For ‘Large’ Rates Fall

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler says some market commentators are predicting further declines in interest rates that would only make sense for an economy in recession, although some easing is likely to be needed to maintain New Zealand’s economic growth. More>>

ALSO:

Ruataniwha Dam: Consent Conditions Could Mean Reduced Intensity

Legal advice sought by the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council on the Ruataniwha Dam consent conditions has confirmed that farmers who sign up to take water from the dam could be required to reduce the intensity of their farming operation to meet the catchment’s strict nitrogen limit. More>>

Health And Safety: Bill Now Sees Rules Relaxed For Small Businesses

Health and safety law reform sparked by the Pike River coalmine disaster has been reported back from the industrial relations select committee with weakened requirements on small businesses to appoint health and safety representatives and committees. More>>

ALSO:

Bearing Fruit: Annual Fruit Exports Hit $2 Billion For First Time

The value of fruit exported rose 20 percent (up $330 million) for the June 2015 year when compared with the year ended June 2014. Both higher prices and a greater quantity of exports (up 9.0 percent) contributed to the overall rise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news