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Science students step up

Science students step up

It’s a big week for Wellington’s next top scientists competing in the 50th annual NIWA Wellington Science Fair

More than 430 entries from 41 schools – including several in te reo - have been received for the competition which offers about $10,500 in prizes.

NIWA scientist and fair co-ordinator Sylvia Nichol says entries this year cover a range of scientific disciplines and explores some thought-provoking and important questions.

“The originality that students display in their projects is very impressive and many show great potential. I hope the work they have done encourages them to consider a career in science.”

The diverse range of projects entered this year include:

• What effect does a marine reserve have on its paua population?

• Are orchestral sounds damaging your hearing?

• What is the most effective way to desalinate salt water?

• Are children or adults better at reading facial expressions?

• Bracing for disaster – best building structures in an earthquake

• Creating the ultimate mousetrap catapault

• Where does my cat go at night?

Victoria University, which is hosting this year's NIWA Wellington Regional Science and Technology Fair, is also providing major prizes including a first year fees scholarship
for a winning senior project and iPad for a successful junior project.
The fair is open to the public on Friday, the same day Victoria holds its annual Study at Vic Open Day when thousands of prospective students, their teachers and parents visit the university to see what is on offer.
Admission to the fair is free and the prizegiving ceremony will be held on Saturday.

NIWA wishes all students entering the fair the very best of luck. NIWA is also a major sponsor of the Auckland, Manukau, Bay of Plenty, and Waikato regional Science and Technology Fairs.

NIWA Wellington Regional Science Fair

Public viewing: Friday, August 29, 9am - 5pm; Saturday, August 30, 9am-1pm.
Admission: free
Venue: School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Laby Building, Victoria University of Wellington
Prizegiving: 1:00pm Saturday 1 September,
For more details see


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