Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Common sense required with stock on roads

[Corrected] 27 August 2014

Common sense required with stock on roads

Federated Farmers is calling for drivers and farmers to exercise caution when it comes to stock on or grazing near roads.

“When it comes to stock and public roads, there is an elevation of risk and likewise responsibility for both the farmer and road users,” says Ian Mackenzie, Federated Farmers Transport Spokesperson.

“Farmers need to ensure their fences and gates are up to standard or they can be liable for any accidents caused. However, drivers who do not drive to the conditions, disregarding the risk of stock on/near roads, can also be held to account.

“The law is reasonably clear when it comes to farmers responsibilities be it fencing through the Animals Law Reform Act 1989 or moving stock under a local council bylaw, but police have done little to educate drivers about driving sensibly on rural roads. The real solution lies in a joint effort – farmers remaining vigilant with managing fences and stock, and police better educating drivers about showing caution and curtesy on rural roads. Driving like a bat out of hell at stock being moved along roads is asking for trouble.

“Along with the Police, Federated Farmers is urging land owners, who are required by their local council to have roadside boundary fences, to check the integrity of their fences and gates, and for motorists to drive to the conditions and ensure their vehicles are up to warrant of fitness standard.

“As a community we can prevent unnecessary accidents by doing the above and also reporting any loose stock, open gates or broken fences to the relevant farmer or police. All you need to do is pull into the nearest driveway or dial *555. It could make all the difference,” concluded Mr Mackenzie.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Taxing Multinationals: EU Ruling Sours Apple

Shares of Apple slid, down 0.9 percent as of 3.08pm in New York, after the European Commission ruled that Ireland granted the company undue tax benefits of up to 13 billion euros (US$14.5 billion)—"illegal aid” under EU rules that the commission says Ireland now must recover from Apple. More>>

ALSO:

NZX Review: Best Practice Code Recommends Code Of Ethics

NZX, the sharemarket operator, is seeking feedback on proposed changes to its corporate governance best practice code including a published code of ethics, rules about share trading and continuous disclosure, and more transparency over board appointments and chief executive pay. More>>

ALSO:

Auditors:

Signs Of Life? SETI On Russian Space(?) Signal

A star system 94 light-years away is in the spotlight as a possible candidate for intelligent inhabitants, thanks to the discovery of a radio signal by a group of Russian astronomers... Could it be a transmission from a technically proficient society? At this point, we can only consider what is known so far. More>>

Post-Post: Brian Roche To Step Down As NZ Post CEO

Brian Roche will step down as chief executive of New Zealand Post in April 2017, having led the state-owned postal service's drive to adjust to shrinking mail volumes with a combination of cost cuts, asset sales, modernisation and expansion of new businesses. More>>

ALSO:

Company Results: Air NZ Rides The Tourism Boom With Record Full-Year Earnings

Air New Zealand has ridden the tourism boom and staved off increased competition to deliver the best full-year earnings in its 76-year history. More>>

ALSO:

New PGP: Sheep Milk Industry Gets $12.6M Crown Funding

The Sheep - Horizon Three programme aims to develop "a market driven, end-to-end value chain generating annual revenues of between $200 million and $700 million by 2030," according to a joint statement. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news