Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Tissue from hospital operating theatre to be rushed to UC

Tissue from hospital operating theatre to be rushed to UC for research

August 28, 2014

Tissues blocking arteries to the brain are to be rushed to the University of Canterbury from Christchurch Hospital operating theatre to be kept alive in a laboratory for five days as part of a New Zealand Heart Foundation funded three-year study into heart and vascular disease.

The university’s medical biochemist, Associate Professor Steve Gieseg, in collaboration with Professor Justin Roake of Christchurch Hospital’s Department of Surgery, will research how white blood cells full of cholesterol in the walls of arteries causes heart disease and strokes.

Artery disease is the leading cause of deaths in New Zealand, accounting for 30 percent of deaths annually. Every 90 minutes a New Zealander dies from coronary heart disease.

The collection of the cells form growths in the artery wall which sometimes have to be removed by surgery as they are blocking the supply of blood to the organs.

``This research is important because we are examining actual plaque and human cells so we can identify key changes in the plaque and blood chemistry so allowing better identification of at risk patients,’’ Associate Professor Gieseg says.

``Tissue taken during surgery will be rushed to the laboratory at the University of Canterbury within 60 minutes of removal. The tissue will be keep alive and functioning for up to five days in the cell culture laboratory in the School of Biological Sciences.

``We will test basic ideas on how the cells respond to cholesterol particles in real patient tissue. We will compare the results to that seen with white blood cells purified from human blood.

``White bloods cells are relatively tough as they have to survive in the hostile environment of infected tissue. Yet when white blood cells encounter damaged cholesterol particles in the wall of arties they often die.

``It is the collection of these dead and dying white blood cells which forms the growths called plaques within the artery wall. The plaques can grow to the point they block the flow of blood. By examining live samples of tissue actually causing artery blockages this research will identify some of the key mechanisms of the cell death. It will also show how the changes in blood chemistry observed in these patients is linked to white blood cells’ reactions in the artery wall.’’

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news