Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Elite programme gives farmers latest genetics for less

Elite programme gives farmers latest genetics for less


Bulls with high reliability give greatest genetic gain for the herd.

With pay outs tipped to decline and farmers wanting to reduce their operating costs, CRV Ambreed’s progeny testing programme is one way to get the latest genetics and other herd improvement products and services at a lower cost.

CRV Ambreed progeny testing programme coordinator, Simon McLachlan, said that to gain maximum return on investment, farmers choose bulls with high reliabilities to get the greatest amount of genetic gain for their herds, with as little risk as possible. But, they can’t achieve this without the progeny testing programme.

“The programme allows CRV Ambreed to identify superior trait leaders and market these as proven bulls,” said Mr McLachlan.

“Hundreds of potential superstars are considered each year to build the team of bulls to progeny test. We select the bulls based on their breeding value, pedigree and phenotypic traits, so farmers can access the latest genetics at a lower price.”

Any farmer can join the programme. They must maintain an excellent standard of records for their herd, use a minimum of 80% of the herd in the programme, herd test four times each year on a classical am/pm testing model, and complete and assist with TOP inspections, live-weight and body condition scoring when requested.

“Progeny testing is fundamental to the future of our industry and we need more farmers to take part,” said Mr McLachlan.

“It gives us the information we need to select the bulls that will fit well into our herds to make us more profitable in the future.”

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news