Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


DOC involved in the Biological Heritage science challenge

DOC involved in the Biological Heritage science challenge


The Department of Conservation (DOC) is excited to be a part of the New Zealand Biological Heritage science challenge that was launched today (August 29).

Science and Innovation Minister Stephen Joyce launched the programme of research, to be undertaken in the challenge, at the Zealandia sanctuary in Wellington this morning.

The programme involves agencies working together on research aimed at developing new ways of tackling issues that threaten our unique native wildlife and plants and the ecosystems they depend on.

“We’re talking about research into how we combat pests such as possums, rats and stoats that threaten the survival of our native birds, including our national symbol the kiwi,” says DOC’s Director-General Lou Sanson.

The programme also includes research into: combating weeds that threaten native plants, which provide homes and food for our unique native wildlife; developing systems to measure the range and richness of our native species and habitats, so we can see the impact of conservation work; developing ways of maintaining healthy and robust ecosystems that support our biological heritage and underpin our economy.

“Our biological heritage goes to the heart of what it is to be a New Zealander. So we’re excited to be one of the agencies involved in the science challenge research programme launched today,” says Lou Sanson.

“This research will help ensure we protect our unique native wildlife and native forests for future generations. If we don’t do this work we could lose the Kiwi within our generation.”

“DOC is already working to develop smarter ways to save our native species and ecosystems, so this challenge aligns with what we’re doing on a day to day basis.”

“The great thing about the challenge is that it brings together scientists from a range of agencies. We’ll have some of New Zealand’s leading experts in this area working together to look at new and innovative ways of securing the survival of our unique wildlife.”

The challenge will also involve the public and aims to have members of the community helping with the research.

The government announced 10 National Science Challenges on May 1 last year. They were developed from the Great NZ Science Project. Each challenge involves scientists from different agencies working together to develop new ways to address these issues.

DOC has been involved in shaping the Biological Heritage science challenge from the beginning. “We thank Landcare Research for their leadership of this challenge and the other agencies we’ve worked with to develop this essential research programme,” says Lou Sanson.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news